WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY
SAMUEL BARBER SUMMER INSTITUTE

Named in honor of West Chester-born composer, Samuel Barber (1910-1981) was noted for his wide range of symphonic and choral works, including the well-known Adagio for Strings. The Samuel Barber Summer Institute offers an innovative combination of traditional academic courses and special subject seminars featuring nationally renowned leaders in 21st century music education. These courses may be applied to NASM-accredited master’s degrees in music education, applied music, piano pedagogy, music history and literature, and music theory, as well as meeting requirements for teacher certification renewal and professional growth programs. Master’s degrees in the WCU Wells School of Music may be earned through an intensive four-summer program or a combination of regular semester and summer studies.

All across our nation difficult decisions are being made to combat the spread of COVID-19 in our communities. Keeping the safety of our students a priority, we are pleased to offer remote learning opportunities this summer.

Further Information:
M. Gregory Martin

SAMUEL BARBER SUMMER INSTITUTE
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SUMMER REMOTE COURSE
OFFERINGS

Learn more about each course by clicking on the title below or download a copy of the full list of course offerings .

Ensembles and Conduction

Deep Diving: Music information, Research and Wikipedia • June 29 - August 1 (Tim Sestrick)

AIM 429: Deep Diving: Music information, Research and Wikipedia (1 CR.)
This course focuses on the development of information literacy and research skills in music. Students learn how to identify, evaluate, and use information as part of the research process; then, using Wikipedia as our jumping-off platform, we will dive deep into the world of scholarly music information and bring back what we find to help edit and enhance this popular resource.


 

Music Education

METHODS & MATERIALS RESEARCH • MAY 26 - JUNE 27 (Dr. Marci Major)

MUE 500: Methods and Materials Research (3 CR.)
This course will cover basic techniques and procedures. Major types of research. Methods for locating, evaluating, and interpreting evidence. Preparation of a research outline.

KODÁLY LEVEL IV: FOLK MUSIC • JULY 20 - JULY 31 (Dr. Jill Trinka)

MUE 567: Kodaly Level IV: Folk Music (2 CR.)
This course is designed to review and identify folk song genre, identify principal researchers and collections, analyze materials collected, and submit a project containing all materials.

INTRO TO INTERNET, MULTIMEDIA, AND COMPUTER ASSISTED INSTRUCTION • JUNE 29 - JULY 3 (Dr. Marc Jacoby)

MUE 592: Intro to Internet, Multimedia, and Computer Assisted Instruction (3 CR.)
This course covers computer-assisted instruction, multimedia and the Internet in elementary and secondary music classroom.

DIGITAL MEDIA FOR MUSIC EDUCATION • JULY 6 - JULY 10 (Dr. Marc Jacoby)

MUE 597: Digital Media for Music Education (3 CR.)
This course covers creating and editing digital multimedia for the music classroom with an emphasis on text, graphics, sound and video. Digital media will be integrated into presentation programs and stand-alone formats such as audio and video tape and CD.

INTEGRATING MUSIC TECHNOLOGY INTO THE CLASSROOM • JULY 20 - JULY 24 (Dr. Marc Jacoby)

MUE 598: Integrating Music Technology into the Classroom (3 CR.)
This course will cover effective teaching strategies using music technology. Topics will include computer-assisted instruction, multimedia, Internet, notation software, sequencing software and electronic instruments.

 

Music Theory Composition / Music History and Literature

STYLE, FORM AND GENRE - GRADUATE REVIEW OF MUSIC HISTORY • JUNE 29 - AUGUST 1 (Ann Hiloski-Fowler)

MHL 501: Style, Form and Genre (3 CR.)
An introduction to the study of music at the graduate level designed as a survey of Western art music with emphasis on fundamental considerations of form, style, and genre. This course is intended primarily for graduate music students who have scored below 70 on the music history graduate admission test.

TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL MUSIC - TOPICS COURSE IN MUSIC HISTORY • JUNE 29 - AUGUST 1 (Dr. Mark Rimple)

MHL 610: Topics in Medieval Music (3 CR.)
This course is an exploration of selected topics in medieval music. Specific topics deal with various aspects of music and musical development during this period. Taught as a seminar with emphasis placed on student participation and research. This summer, we will take an interdisciplinary approach to ideas of celestial, human, and sounding music from their origins in Antiquity into the Medieval period and beyond. We will examine ideas of consonance, proportion, and hierarchy as found in the works of Plato, Neoplatonism, the Pythagoreans, and other ancient thinkers as they appear in the works of medieval poets, musicians and philosophers, reading works by Boethius, Guillaume da Machaut, and several influential music treatises. We will then trace the long tail of the medieval tradition into the Renaissance and beyond, proving that medieval Pythagorean-platonic harmony and its elements persist and shape the works of Shakespeare, Bach, and even into 20th century thinkers like Heinrich Schenker, Claude Debussy, Virginia Woolf and Paul Hindemith, directly and indirectly. And it will help to provide a deep context for many of our contemporary musical assumptions.

STUDIO PRODUCTION - AVAILABLE TO WEST CHESTER SCHOOL DISTRICT HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ONLY (Quinn Collins)

MTC 272: Studio Production (3 CR.)
This course focuses on the techniques of music production in computer software. Students learn about basic editing, mixing, synthesis, sampling, and MIDI sequencing via creative projects, focusing on virtual instruments in a digital audio workstation. All software used in this course is free and available for both Windows and Macintosh computers.

COMPOSITION 1 - INTRODUCTION TO THE TECHNIQUES OF MUSIC COMPOSITION • JUNE 29 - AUGUST 1 (Dr. Robert Maggio)

MTC 512: Composition 1 (3 CR.)
Exploration of basic compositional principles with a focus on the development of each student’s diverse musical interests. Students compose a large project of their own design, and short exercises in order to progressively develop basic compositional skills. Additionally, students will complete three compositional “challenges” that will focus on different approaches to creating music. Works in progress are evaluated by peer and instructor critiques of Sibelius or Finale files.

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