PCTM - WCu West Chester University - PAMTE

Pre-Service Mathematics Teacher Day Conference
Hosted by West Chester University Mathematics Department
Sponsored by PCTM and PAMTE 

Pre-Service Teacher Day picture       Pre-Service Teacher Day

This years Pre-Service Teacher Day – East was held at West Chester University. There were over 80 students in attendance. Dr. Kathleen McAneny gave the key-note address on Standards for Mathematical Practices in Action. We had 9 breakout sessions that included topics such as DESMOS Polygraph, Think Like an Egyptian, Purposeful Discourse, Teaching for Engagement, Using Mistakes to identify misconceptions, and many more. We had a panel on first year and student teaching, where tips and tricks were shared for those preparing for the next step in their journey. A productive day was enjoyed by all who attended.  

This event was co-organized by Dr. Brian Bowen, Dr. Kim Johnson and Dr. Emily K. Miller, with sponsorship from PCTM and PAMTE.

Pre-Service Teacher Day Picture

(Click here to see more pictures from this conference)

Time Session
9:00 – 9:25 Registration (25 University Avenue) Coffee, tea, & refreshments
9:30 – 10:15  Break-Out Session I (25 University Avenue)
10:25 – 11:10  Break-Out Session II (25 University Avenue)
11:20 – 12:05  Break-Out Session III (25 University Avenue)
The break-out sessions descriptions and rooms are listed on the following pages.
12:10 – 1:00  Lunch (25 University Avenue)
1:15 – 2:00  Student Teaching Discussions (BPMC 101)
2:15 – 3:15  Keynote Presentation: Kathleen “Taffy” McAneny (BPMC 101)
3:15 – 3:30  Closing Remarks (BPMC 101)

Break-Out Session I (9:30 am - 10:15 am)

Information Session

Think Like an Egyptian
Lara Dick, Bucknell University

In this session we will explore how the ancient Egyptians used fractions.  Connections will be made to unit fractions, equivalent fractions and fraction addition.  Come play with fraction tiles and be ready to write your own Egyptian fractions using hieroglyphs.

UNA 155

Exploring the Three Ps of Discourse: Purposeful, Productive, and Powerful
Michelle Cirillo, University of Delaware

NCTM's fourth Effective Mathematics Teaching Practice is Facilitate Meaningful Discourse. As the authors of NCTM's past discourse standards documents argued, the discourse of a classroom, the ways of thinking, talking, agreeing, and disagreeing, is central to students' opportunities to learn mathematics (NCTM, 1991). Consideration of who talks, about what, and in what ways is central to equitable mathematics teaching. A set of research-based discourse moves that foster meaningful discourse and support formative assessment will be explored through the lenses of purposeful, productive, and powerful discourse. Examples of and things to consider about each move will also be discussed.

UNA 158

 Polygraph
Leigh Nataro, Desmos

Discover a Desmos activity that will help students move from informal language to formal mathematical vocabulary.  Experience Polygraph from the student perspective and learn how to build your own Polygraph.

UNA 161

Break-Out Session II (10:25 am – 11:10 am)

Information Session

Teaching for Engagement and Eliciting Evidence of Student Thinking
Marian Avery, Past President of PCTM

An example lesson, at the request of some of my Pre-Service Teacher friends, utilizes formative assessment, building new knowledge on past learning, eliciting evidence of student thinking, empowering students with their own learning, getting students out of their seats to demonstrate their understanding, the strength of student collaboration within small groups, and the development of a positive classroom learning climate.  The lesson centers on solving algebraic equations from simple one step to complex multi-step equations involving symbols of enclosure, fractions, and variables on both sides of the equation while utilizing “sticks” and individual white boards.

UNA 155

Which One is Correct? – Using Comparison of Worked Examples to Assist Algebra Students in Identifying Errors and Misconceptions
Sue Kelly, Temple University

Comparison is a useful tool in real-world decision making, for example comparing features in order to decide which phone to buy. In this session, I will explain how I use comparison to help students identify important features of a problem and to recognize common errors in algebra. You will also get to try some comparisons for yourself. 

UNA 158

 Polygraph
Leigh Nataro, Desmos

Discover a Desmos activity that will help students move from informal language to formal mathematical vocabulary.  Experience Polygraph from the student perspective and learn how to build your own Polygraph.

UNA 161

Break-Out Session III (11:20 am – 12:05 pm)

Information Session

Promoting Representations-Based Argumentation in the Mathematics Classroom
Jamila Riser, Delaware Mathematics Coalition

NCTM's recommendations for teaching include engaging students in mathematical reasoning, discourse, and making sense of one another's ideas. This session will feature a structured way to make that happen in your classroom. We will engage in doing math using the protocol as learners and then unpack the learning sequence in an effort to better understand how the structure is used to invite students to make conjectures, reason with representations, and engage in mathematical argumentation and proof.

UNA 155

Uh-oh! (Mis)Taking Learning Opportunities
Daniel Lujetic, ASSET STEM Education

How do you address mistakes with your students, since they happen every day?  When teachers value mistakes and use them as learning opportunities, students have more of a growth mindset.  This session will help teachers reflect on their practices to shift from mistakes as merely wrong answers to mistakes as essential learning opportunities.

UNA 158

How We Talk about Kids: Aligning What We Say with what we want for our students
Rob Wieman, Rowan University

“He is so bright, but he just isn’t motivated.”  “This group just can’t be trusted to work in groups without constant supervision.”  “She is really, really smart.”  “All they care about is grades.”  “This class is . . . interesting”

Have you ever had a teacher say something about you that was really not helpful? Have you ever dealt with a difficult student and felt that what was really needed was for someone to stop beating around the bush and say what is really happening?  

In this session we will look at things we have said about students and think about their effects on children and on ourselves.  We will discuss traps that lead us to say things that may have negative consequences, and ways to avoid those traps so that we can best take care of ourselves and serve our students.

UNA 161

Student Teaching Sessions (1:15 pm – 2:00 pm)

The Student Teaching Session will feature a panel that will provide tips and tricks for preparing for the student teaching experience. Participants will have time to ask questions.

Information Session
Panelists:  Kathryn McLaughlin, Alexandra Tipton, Hunter Langel, Kelly Schmoock, & Anthony Zortea BPMC 101

Keynote Presentation (2:15 pm – 3:15 pm)

Information Session

Standards for Mathematical Practices in Action
Kathleen “Taffy” McAneny

In the Common Core State Standards document, there are three pages of explanation for the eight Standards for Mathematical Practices. These standards “describe varieties of expertise that mathematics educators at all levels should seek to develop in their students. These practices rest on important ‘processes and proficiencies’ with longstanding importance in mathematics education” (CCSS, 2010).  However, there is little advice in the document about how to assimilate these standards into instruction or how to help students internalize them for use in their own thinking. During the opening session, participants will delve into the eight Standards for Mathematical Practices by engaging in instructional routines that are designed to make students’ thinking visible.
BPMC 101

 

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