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UNDERGRADUATE

SHADOW DAY (RESERVED FOR H.S. SENIORS)

Shadow Days are a great way to help you envision your life as a music student at the Wells School of Music. Future Shadow days will be announced throughout the academic year.

APPLYING TO THE WELLS SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Step One:

Apply to the University.  You can do so by submitting The Common Application or our own West Chester University Application.

Step Two

After your university application has been submitted, you will be able to register for an Audition Day in your Admissions Portal. Attending an Audition Day is required for admission to the Wells School of Music. All of our Audition Days will be held virtually this year. Students will upload an audition video to their applicant portal and sign up for a “live” zoom session with their studio teacher to complete the audition process.

For students looking to audition for Fall 2021, please contact Brittany Grason, Associate Director of Music Admission (bgrason@wcupa.edu) to schedule your audition.

Students who are looking to be admitted for Spring 2022 or Fall 2022, audition dates will be announced during the summer.


Step Three:

Notification of Acceptance: Students are required to earn a minimum audition score for acceptance into their chosen major program within the Wells School of Music. We will notify you of your audition results by email. You will only hear if you have been admitted to West Chester University if your application is complete. Final admissions decision will be sent by the Office of Admissions.

AUDITION REQUIREMENTS

All prospective music majors must complete an audition on their primary instrument only. Students interested in pursuing a degree in Theory, Composition, Music Therapy, or Jazz Performance have additional requirements to complete. Transfer students should bring a list of repertoire performed in recent recitals or juries. Still have questions and want to learn more about the Wells School of Music – check out our FAQ or contact us at musicinfo@wcupa.edu.

WOODWIND

  • Flute: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Oboe: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Clarinet: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Saxophone: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Bassoon: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.

BRASS

  • Trumpet: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • French Horn: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Trombone: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Euphonium: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Tuba: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.

STRINGS

  • Violin: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Viola: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Cello: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.
  • Double Bass: One movement from a Baroque Sonata (e.g. Bach, Marcello, Vivaldi, Corelli, Eccles, etc.) and one movement from a Classical, Romantic, or Contemporary piece (e.g. Dragonetti, Dittersdorf, Koussevitzky, Proto, Rabbath, etc.)
  • Classical Guitar: Two classical guitar solos (melody and supporting parts are all played simultaneously on one guitar). Guitar solos by any of the following composers are acceptable: Sor, Giuliani, Carcassi, Aguado, Carulli, Tárrega, Sagreras, Villa-Lobos, Barrios, Brouwer, Dowland, Milan, Visée, Weiss, and Bach. Guitarists must also play major and minor scales in open position meaning the first four frets. One-octave and two-octave scales must be played at quarter note = 60 (with 8th notes, triplets, and 16th notes) with index and middle right-hand finger alternation, rest stroke scales.
  • Harp: Two pieces/movements of your choice, in contrasting styles; all major scales; sight-reading.

PERCUSSION

  • Demonstrate proficiency on snare drum, marimba (xylophone and vibraphone are also acceptable), and timpani; sight-reading (snare drum and 2-mallet marimba); major scales; snare drum rudiments.
  • Snare drum: A concert snare drum etude/solo (e.g. Cirone, Delecluse, Firth, etc.). Students can elect to prepare a rudimental snare drum etude/solo (e.g. Pratt, Wilcoxon, etc.) in addition to the concert snare drum etude/solo.
  • Keyboard percussion: At least one keyboard percussion solo/etude (2 mallets or 4 mallets; marimba, xylophone, or vibraphone).
  • Timpani: One timpani etude/solo (e.g. Goodman, Peters, Carroll, Beck, etc.).
  • If you have concerns regarding access to your high school’s percussion instruments when it comes time to record your Wells School of Music entrance audition video, please email Dr. Ralph Sorrentino

JAZZ

  • All applicants must complete the above classical requirements in addition to the following jazz components. This major is only offered for saxophone, trumpet, trombone, guitar, double bass, percussion, and piano.
  • Tunes: Three tunes in contrasting style with CD accompaniment (Jamey Aebersold or other)
    • Interpret a melody in an effective and creative way
    • Improvise on chord changes in a confident manner to perform an original solo that is creative and musically effective
  • Scales (except percussion)
    • Major, harmonic minor, melodic minor (modes from the ascending melodic minor only), diminished (half/whole & whole/half), whole tone, pentatonic

PIANO

Piano Performance

  • Technique:
    • Scales, major and minor (harmonic and melodic), four octaves, hands together. Suggested minimum tempo, quarter note M.M. = 132 (4 notes/click)
    • Arpeggios, major and minor, four octaves, hands together. Suggested minimum tempo, M.M. = 112 (3 notes/click)
  • Repertoire:
    • All works are to be performed from memory. In certain cases, literature substitutions may be made upon request.
    • A Prelude and Fugue, Toccata, or several movements from a Suite or Partita by J.S. Bach
    • A complete sonata by Haydn, Mozart, Schubert or Beethoven (excluding Op. 49 and Op. 79)
    • A solo work of substantial length and difficulty from the 19th, 20th, or 21st century
  • Sight Reading:
    • A solo piano example

All Other Degrees

  • Technique:
    • Scales, major and minor (harmonic and melodic), four octaves
    • Arpeggios, major and minor, hands together, four octaves, at a fluent tempo
  • Repertoire:
    • All works are to be performed from memory. In certain cases, literature substitutions may be made upon request.
    • A two or three-part Invention of J.S. Bach, or Scarlatti Sonata
    • The first movement of a sonata by Haydn, Mozart, Schubert, or Beethoven (excluding Op. 49 and Op. 79)
    • Any piece from the 19th, 20th, or 21st century, equivalent in difficulty to the sonata movement above
  • Sight Reading:
    • A solo piano example

ORGAN

  • Repertoire: memory is not required
    • Prelude & Fugue by J.S. Bach
    • 19th century work
    • 20th/21st century work
    • Hymn
  • Sight Reading: A solo organ example

VOICE

  • Vocal performance: three solo songs, memorized. English and foreign language must be represented. No choral music excerpts or Musical Theatre, please.
  • All other degrees: Two art-songs, in contrasting styles, memorized. No choral music excerpts or Musical Theatre, please.
  • It is not necessary to bring an accompanist. However, please choose your repertoire with the understanding that a voice faculty member will serve as your accompanist and no prior rehearsal in provided

History, THEORY, AND COMPOSITION DEGREES

  • All applicants must complete the above classical requirements on their primary instrument, an interview with our History, Theory, or Composition faculty, and the following components.
  • Composers: Three scores and recordings (an mp3 of MIDI playback is acceptable) of original compositions (no arrangements).
  • Theorists: Roman numeral analysis and written analysis in the form of short essays of three compositions from different eras (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, etc.).
  • Historians: A writing sample (minimum 700-1,000 words) on any musical topic and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

MUSIC THERAPY

All applicants must complete the above classical requirements on their primary instrument as well as the following requirements:

  • Sing a song from any genre of music (pop song, children’s song, etc.), while self-accompanying on piano or guitar, if possible.
  • Submit an essay, up to 2 pages, answering the following questions:
    • Why are you interested in becoming a music therapist?
    • Based upon your experience, please describe at least one example as to how music therapy may provide benefits to clients and patients.

Note: It is recommended that prospective music therapy majors either observe a music therapy session or speak with a board-certified music therapist prior to applying for the degree program. This will allow prospective candidates to have a better understanding of the field before auditioning.

PLACEMENT TESTS

Placement tests for the Wells School of Music occur after students place their deposit to secure a spot in our fall class. Students will receive emails during the month of May providing access to the below exams via D2L.

AURAL SKILLS EVALUATION

The material tested on this quiz is as follows:

  • Section 1: Identifying melodic contour: matching sounded melodies to musical notation
  • Section 2: Melody singing: reading musical passages and singing them using solfège. For this, students will need to access the camera and microphone features of the device being used to take the placement exam.

ADVANCED MUSICIANSHIP PLACEMENT EXAM

This quiz may be taken to determine if it is appropriate for an incoming student to “pass out” of Aural Activities I (MTC 114) and instead be placed in Aural Activities II (MTC 115). Incoming students do not need to take this quiz if they feel that entering in the first level of musicianship is appropriate; they will instead be placed directly into MTC 114.

No musical instrument may be used as a reference while taking this placement test.

The material tested on this quiz is as follows:

  • Section 1: Identifying intervals: identifying sounded intervals by size and quality (major second, minor sixth, etc.)
  • Section 2: Identifying chord qualities: identifying sounded root-position chords by quality (major, minor, diminished, augmented, dom7, sus)
  • Section 3: First scale degrees: identifying the first scale degree heard in recordings.
  • Section 4: Solfege: reading musical passages and singing them using movable-DO solfège. For this, students will need to access the camera and microphone features of the device being used to take the placement exam.

ADVANCED THEORY PLACEMENT EXAM

This quiz may be taken to determine if it is appropriate for an incoming student to “pass out” of Music Theory I (MTC 112) and instead be placed in Music Theory II (MTC 113). Incoming students do not need to take this quiz if they feel that entering in the first level of music theory is appropriate; they will instead be placed directly into MTC 112.

The material tested on this quiz is as follows:

  • Time signatures: reading a musical passage and choosing what time signature would be appropriate based on note durations and beaming patterns.
  • Scales and modes: reading scales and determining if they represent modes such as major, harmonic minor, whole-tone, chromatic, octatonic, etc.
  • Intervals: identifying the size of musical intervals, such as major second, augmented fourth, etc.) and choosing a pitch that is a specified interval above or below a given note.
  • Chords: reading chords and determining root (by pitch name), quality (major, minor, dom7, etc.), and position (5/3, 4/3, etc.).
  • Non-chord tones: labeling non-chord tones by type (passing tone, appoggiatura, etc.).
  • Harmonic function analysis: assigning Roman numerals to chords based on their relationship to a key.
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