Dr. Jen Maresh

Dr. Jen Maresh

Associate Professor of Biology

Areas of Interest: Animal Bioenergetics, Evolution of Mammalian Maternal Investment Strategies, Physio-Ecology of Marine Mammals, Conservation & Sustainability

  • B.S. Biology: Ecology, West Chester University
  • M.E.M. Coastal Environmental Management, Duke University
  • Ph.D Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of California-Santa Cruz
  • Office: Merion 317
  • Voice: 610-436-2318
  • Website: The Maresh Lab
  • Email Dr. Jen Maresh

Office Hours

Fall 2022

Office hours are by appointment only, in person or via Zoom.

BEFORE Fall Break: Tue 9:30 - 11:30 AM;  Wed 12:00 - 1:00 PM (Zoom only); Thu 9:30  - 11:30 AM
AFTER Fall Break: Tue 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM; Wed 12:00 - 1:30 PM (Zoom only); Thu 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Book an appointment before we meet.

 

Fall 2022 Courses

BIO 111 General Biology II

  • Focuses on evolutionary history of life, biodiversity, and structure and function of plants and animals, and examines each in the context of global change. This course is the second in a series of core general Biology courses required for Biology majors.
  • Course offered: every semester, lecture & lab

 

BIO 469 Human Physiology

  • Advanced-level examination of the physiological processes associated with homeostasis in the human body. Students learn how the body meets changing demands while maintaining the internal constancy required for all cells and organ systems to function. This course is required for Pharmaceutical Product Development majors and may be taken as a Biology Elective for Chemistry-Biology, Integrative Biology, and Cell & Molecular Biology majors. Due to content overlap, this course may not be taken for Bio Elective credit by students who have already taken BIO 468.
  • Course offered: every Fall, lecture & lab

 

Courses Taught in other Semesters

FYE 100 First Year Experience

  • Focuses on activities associated with a successful transition from high school to college, including: choosing a major, development of a 4-year coursework plan and e-portfolio, general education requirements, service learning, study skills and time management strategies, information and digital literacy, professionalism in the age of social media, e-mail etiquette, mental and physical health, stress mitigation strategies, diversity and inclusion culture, violence and sexual assault prevention, WCU policies, and the when/how/why of various resources and opportunities on campus. This course is required for every student matriculating with fewer than 24 credits.
  • Course offered: every semester, lecture & discussion

 

BIO 259 Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab

  • Practical activities associated with human structure and function.  Laboratory involves study of human development and gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. This course is the first in a series of Biology courses required for any student majoring in a Health Science, and may not be taken as a Biology major elective.
  • Course offered: every semester

 

BIO 269 Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

  • Practical activities associated with how the human body maintains homeostasis and some of the major problems that can occur with each of the major organ systems, including: endocrinology, immunology, cardiovascular physiology, respiratory physiology, urinary physiology, digestive physiology and reproductive physiology. This course is the second in a series of Biology courses required for any student majoring in a Health Science, and may not be taken as a Biology major elective.
  • Course offered: every semester
     

BIO 435/535 Course Topics in Biology: Animal Conservation Biology

  • Upper-level undergraduate / graduate-level course examining interesting case studies of situations where understanding some aspect of an animal’s biology was key in conservation efforts for that species. Emphasis is on both the biology and the human dimensions of the original (and oftentimes continuing) problem: What is the socio-political barrier(s) or inertia that put this species’ persistence into jeopardy in the first place? Has the problem been solved, or is it ongoing, and why?
  • Course offered: Winter Sessions (This year: Jan 3-Jan 22, 2023)

 

BIO 453 Marine Mammal Biology

  • Survey of the five mammalian taxonomic groups that have independently and successfully transitioned to an aquatic existence in the last 50 million years: the cetaceans, pinnipeds, sirenians, sea otter and polar bear. Students examine how different marine mammals have adapted to life in the water, including changes in morphology, physiology, and behavior, and learn about marine mammals within the context of historical and modern-day interactions with humans. This course is a Biology Elective for Biology majors.
  • Course offered: even-year Spring, lecture

 

BIO 468 Comparative Vertebrate Physiology

  • In-depth examination of the great diversity of physiological processes associated with homeostasis across major vertebrate taxa. Students learn how different organisms have solved the problem of maintaining the internal constancy required for all cells and organ systems to function, as well as the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying characteristics of whole organisms within the specific contexts of their environments. This course is a Biology Elective for Biology majors, but due to content overlap, this course may not be taken for Bio Elective credit by students who have already taken BIO 469.
  • Course offered: every Spring, lecture & lab
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