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Applied Statistics

Intermediate Linear Models - 513

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Applied Statistics

Address:
25 University Ave
West Chester, PA 19383


Phone: 610-436-2440
Email: Randy Reiger

Intermediate Linear Models - 513

Course Objectives

Students completing this course should:

  • Advance the tools learned in STAT 512.
  • Be competent in GLM model building and diagnostics
  • Understand the Matrix representation of the reviewed models
  • Be introduced to extensions of the GLM models such as Random Effects Models, Mixed Effects Models and Generalized Linear Models.
  • Competent with SAS Procedures PROC GLM, PROC GENMOD, PROC LOGISTIC, PROC PHREG, and PROC MIXED.

Topics:Students will be using SAS 9. Students should be competent in using SAS prior to taking this course. The following skills are expected to be known:

  • Reading and creating SAS data sets.
  • Familiarity with PROC REG and PROC GLM introduced in STAT 512.
  • Able to save output files, SAS code, and SAS logs
  • Install SAS on their personal computer.
  • Comfortable in the SAS LAB.

Read the Course Descriptions

Example Syllabus

STAT 513 – Intermediate Linear Models

Office Hours: T 4:30-5:30PM & 9:00-10:00PM , W 2:30-4:30PM, R 10-11AM

Class Time: Tues 5:45 – 9:00pm

Textbooks
  1. Applied Linear Statistical Models (5th ed) Neter, Kutner, Nachtsheim, and Wasserman (WHITE BOOK NOT BLUE).

  2. *An Introduction to Generalized Linear Models (2nd ed) Annette Dobson (OPTIONAL)

  3. *SAS System for Mixed Models (2nd ed), Littell, Milliken, Stroup,Wolfinger, Schabenberger (OPTIONAL)

Objectives

Students completing this course should

  • Advance the tools learned in STAT 512.
  • Be competent in GLM model building and diagnostics
  • Understand the Matrix representation of the reviewed models
  • Be introduced to extensions of the GLM models such as Random Effects Models, Mixed Effects Models and Generalized Linear Models.
  • Competent with SAS Procedures PROC GLM, PROC GENMOD, PROC LOGISTIC, PROC PHREG, and PROC MIXED.
Technology

Students will be using SAS 9. Students should be competent in using SAS prior to taking this course. The following skills are expected to be known:

  • Reading and creating SAS data sets.
  • Familiarity with PROC REG and PROC GLM introduced in STAT 512.
  • Able to save output files, SAS code, and SAS logs.
  • Install SAS on their personal computer.
  • Comfortable in the SAS LAB.
Evaluation

Two in class tests at 25% each (10/9 & 11/13) and the final exam at 25%, homework at 10%, individual project at 15%. Test and Exam will include computer portion as well as pen/pencil portion. Available materials will be discussed the week prior to the test. Take Home final exam will be provided prior to the Thanksgiving Holiday and will be due prior by the last Thursday of classes.

Attendance: Attendance is important and expected. Absence from a test is acceptable for illness/emergency/official University business. Please contact me ASAP by e-mail or phone. Written verification may be required.

Dishonesty: Any instance of dishonesty will be dealt with according to University policy.

Disabilities: We at West Chester University wish to make accommodations for persons with disabilities. Please make your needs known to me and to the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities (3217). Sufficient notice is needed in order to make accommodations possible.

Withdrawl: 3rd week of October.

Topics: We will follow the Neter et al. book Chapter 15-25, 27 then followed by Chapter 14 (optionally 13).

Homework Assignments

All Homework will be assigned at the end of each class and from the textbook. Homework is to be turned in. Homework to be turned in must include SAS code and SAS output. I recommend you cut and past your syntax in word and use ODS to include the relavant output into WORD. Your summary must be complete and easily interpreted.

Lab Projects

At the end of most classes, a real life setting data set will be assigned to be analyzed individually and discussed the last portion of class or left to be done on your own time, with Q & A at your discretion.

Project

The project is worth 10% of your grade. Half of this will be based on a written report, the other half on an oral presentation. See below for the schedule of oral presentations.

The written report should be 5 pages orless. It should include the following sections:

  1. Background. Give a short description of the problem and its significance.
  2. Data. Describe the variables and give the number of cases. Indicate any special characteristics concerning the experimental design.
  3. Model. Explain the statistical model that is the basis for your analysis.
  4. Results. Describe the results of your analysis. You can include short tables and graphical displays here.
  5. Conclusions. State your conclusions in terms of the context of the background information that you provided in the first section. Be concise and avoid technical jargon.

Note that there are 15 minutes between the start of each presentation. This means that you will have 10 or at most 12 minutes for your presentation. All presentations will be done in PowerPoint.

Getting Started
  • DATA FROM THE NIDA COCAINE COLLABORATIVE STUDY
  • Plan your analysis or potential Hypothesis
  • Do a first set of analyses including basic descriptive statistics with plots and charts as appropriate
  • Run your basic models; discuss the results and refine the analysis
  • Check model assumptions

Presentations are scheduled for during the Final Exam Period.

More Comments

This class will be extremely fast paced. It is important that the students review the respective chapters in the text book prior to class. This class is 4 credits; therefore, the class may run over the 8:30 P.M. end time. Class time will be split in the Classroom and the computer lab. Do not fall behind in this course. This course coupled with the Categorical Data Analysis course will be extremely challenging, but mastery of these two topics will be tools you will use throughout your careers as statisticians.

Let’s have fun and get to work.

References

The material presented here is from a collection of sources.  Some from the web, textbook, or hard-copy handouts.  The collection of these materials I hope bring the material in a complete and concise format.

 

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