Probation and Dismissal

Academic Standing: Good Academic Standing, Probation, and Dismissal

Your academic standing at the University is indicated by your cumulative grade point average (GPA). There are three categories of academic standing: good academic standing, probation, and dismissal. You remain in good academic standing as long as you maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 for all work taken at the University. Probation and dismissal are actions taken by the University when your GPA falls below an acceptable level.  Please feel free to reach out to the Associate Registrar for Student Support, Ms. Andrea Grinwis, anytime you have questions on academic standing.

Forms Related to Academic Standing

Academic Progress Plan (APP) Dismissal Appeal Form

Coming soon.

A Dismissal Appeal Form is used to appeal an academic dismissal from the university. See the Academic Dismissal section below for further details.

Deadline for Dismissal Appeal Form submission:  

TBD

Academic Probation

Academic Probation is defined as "a trial period during which a student, whose cumulative GPA has fallen below acceptable standards, must bring their average up or be dismissed from the University." Once on probation, you have one full-time semester to raise your cumulative GPA back to 2.00. For complete details on academic probation, please refer to the Undergraduate Catalog.

How will I be notified that I am on academic probation?

If you are placed on Academic Probation, a letter will be emailed to you to alert you to this change in your academic standing. 

Once on academic probation, how many semesters do I have to bring my cumulative GPA back to a 2.00?

You have one full-time semester to raise your cumulative GPA to a 2.00. Failure to do this will result in an Academic Dismissal.

How many times am I allowed to be on academic probation?

You may be placed on probation twice. Placement on probation for the third time will trigger an automatic dismissal.

Will academic probation prevent me from scheduling classes?

No, academic probation refers to your academic standing; it is not the same as a hold. However, if you do not meet the deadline to have an Academic Recovery Plan completed, you will receive a hold on your account. An ARP hold will prevent you from scheduling.

How does probation affect Financial Aid?

The rules about satisfactory academic progress for purposes of receiving financial aid and academic probation are very different. You must pass 67% of all attempted credits and have a 2.00 cumulative GPA after four semesters (including winter and summer sessions) in order to continue to receive federal financial aid. If you receive a state grant, you must pass 24 credits for every full-time academic year a state grant is received. If you worry you will be placed on academic probation, it is a good idea to speak with the Financial Aid Office to determine how your aid will be affected.

If I'm on probation, do I have to be a full-time student?

No, if you wish to drop to part-time, you may do so. In fact, if you are a full-time student on probation and you fear that you will soon be dismissed, you may wish to drop to part-time status. Any full-time student on probation for the first time, who does not return to good academic standing, but instead drops to part-time status before the end of the semester, will automatically be placed on continued probation. Once you have been placed on continued probation, however, dropping to part-time will not protect you from dismissal. Once you are placed on continued probation, you must return to good academic standing or face dismissal from the university.

If I'm on probation, am I allowed to withdraw from a class?

Yes, your academic standing does not affect your ability to make changes to your schedule. Also, if you wish to withdraw from the University for a semester or two, you may do that, as well. As long as you are only out for one or two semesters, you will not need to reapply in order to return. Keep in mind: you will still be on probation once you return.  If you are out for longer than two semesters, you will need to reapply.

Academic Progress Plans (APPs)

Information will be available soon.

Academic Dismissal

If you have been placed on academic probation, and you are not able to raise your cumulative GPA to a 2.00 at the end of one full-time semester, you will be subject to Academic Dismissal from the University. For complete details on academic dismissal, please refer to the Undergraduate Catalog.

I was dismissed after my first semester, how is this possible?

Any full-time student, who earns a 0.00 cumulative GPA after their first semester at WCU, will receive an automatic dismissal. (This policy does not apply to students scheduled for fewer than 12 credits.)

Is there any way to prevent being dismissed?

If you are a full-time student on probation, you may wish to drop to part-time status. Any full-time student on probation for the first time, who does not return to good academic standing, but instead drops to part-time status before the end of the semester, will automatically be placed on continued probation. Once you have been placed on continued probation, however, dropping to part-time will not protect you from dismissal. Once you are placed on continued probation, you must return to good academic standing or face dismissal from the university.

Can I appeal a dismissal?

Yes, a student who is subject to dismissal may appeal to the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs.

The Associate Provost may grant a semester on extended probation if:

  1. You have made progress towards good academic standing and
  2. It is both mathematically possible and probable that you will be able to reach a 2.00, by the end of the additional semester.

Appealing is a very informal process. Simply complete the Dismissal Appeal Form found above, and email the completed form to dismissal@wcupa.edu. The Associate Provost for Academic Affairs will make a decision and respond within a week.

Is there ever a time when a dismissal appeal is not possible?

An additional semester on extended probation will not be granted if:

  1. you were dismissed after receiving a 0.00 after your first semester or
  2. you were dismissed because you were placed on probation for the third time. Both of these situations trigger an automatic dismissal.

Can I still take winter/summer courses if I'm dismissed?

No, once you are dismissed, you are not eligible to take any further course work at the University for one calendar year. At the end of one year, you may reapply to WCU.

I received a dismissal letter, but I still see classes on my schedule. Why?

Even though you have been dismissed, your schedule for the next semester will not be canceled until you have had time to appeal. Your classes will be canceled a couple weeks before classes begin for the next semester.

I was dismissed, but I've already paid my tuition. Will I get that money back?

Yes, you will receive a full refund for any tuition paid for the upcoming semester.

How will I be notified that I have been dismissed from the university?

If you are subject to dismissal from WCU, an email will be sent to your WCU email address to alert you to this change in your academic standing. 

I was dismissed from WCU, may I take classes elsewhere?

Yes, if you are dismissed from the University, you may go elsewhere for coursework. In fact, students who wish to eventually reapply to WCU are encouraged to take courses at another university, in order to show their ability to maintain good academic standing while doing college-level work. 

I was dismissed from WCU a year ago. How do I reapply?

You don't need to check in with the Academic Affairs Office before reapplying. Simply fill out the application for readmission, as found on the Undergraduate Admissions website. Once you've completed and submitted your application, the Admissions Office will forward all the necessary paperwork to the Academic Affairs Office for review.

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