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RECAP

Sessions

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RECAP

Address:
Anderson Hall, Room 020
725 S. Church Street
West Chester, PA 19383


Email: RECAP@wcupa.edu

PDF Session Schedule

Sessions

RECAP Conference sessions align with one of the session themes identified by the RECAP Planning and Content teams as representing current topics of interest in higher education. Sessions focus on sharing or modeling innovative uses of technology while allowing for interaction among participants. These sessions address "how to" as well as "why-to."

Session 1 - 10:15am to 11:00am

Session 1

Online Examinations: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

Presenter: Rich Mehrenberg, Millersville University

This presentation provides an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of implementing online examination in college courses. Advantages such as convenience, speed, and flexibility will be reviewed. Disadvantages such as ambiguity, decreased consideration for testing accommodations, and increased potential for cheating will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives: 1) The attendee will explain and give examples of the following online testing advantages (convenience, speed, and flexibility). 2) The attendee will explain and give example of the following online testing disadvantages (ambiguity, less accommodations, cheating). 3) The attendee will be able to successfully setup a simple objective online assessment via D2L.

Location: BPC 204


Session 1

Run, Jump, Code. Everyone Can Do It?

Presenter: Jordan Schugar and Laquana Cooke, West Chester University

Did Apple just launch the best way to teach anyone to code? Is the coding revolution afoot? Can everyone really code? This study aims to bring together a diverse team of humanities and education professors who are interested in helping prepare current and future teachers for the classroom of the future which will most likely include elements of coding.

Learning Objectives: In this session, we will describe what indicators best predicted pre-service teachers’ abilities to learn to code as our data examines the associations between students reading, math, and writing aptitude and the ease in which they learned to code. In addition, we explored how pre-service teachers’ background knowledge about coding as well as their interest and attitudes toward coding was associated with the learn-to-code movement. We used SAT scores as a measure of students’ reading/writing/math aptitude, and a researcher-developed survey to measure knowledge, attitudes, and interests. Achievement and success with coding was measured with end-of-unit tasks where students demonstrated whether they could apply the coding skills taught in each unit.

Location: BPC 205


Session 1

Transitioning to Online: Deliberate Course Development and Use of Web-based Collaboration Tools to Engage Students in Mastery of Clinical Skills

Presenter: Jennifer Aucoin, Gwynedd Mercy University

This session focuses on the development process used to transition a clinical skills-based degree program to an online learning environment. Presenters will review web-based tools used to engage students in virtual skills practice and will discuss issues that arose during the course building process and the initial teaching of the course.

Learning Objectives: Attendees will understand the design process used for implementation of online tools. Attendees will identify tools used for student collaboration and skill demonstration.

Location: BPC 208


Session 1

Choose Your Own Simulation

Presenter: Vicki McGinley and Tom Pantazes, West Chester University

If practice makes permanent, how are you incorporating practice opportunities into your courses? Have you considered simulations? If you think they are too hard to develop, then this presentation is for you. In just 45 minutes, you will learn what the research says about the value of simulations, the simple steps to developing a simulation script, and how anyone who can create a D2L course page can create their own simulations. As an added bonus, you will get a chance to practice some of these techniques during the session.

Learning Objectives: After the presentation, participants will be able to describe three benefits of using simulations in instruction, one of which is UDL the steps of simulation script development three simulation construction options available at WCU.

Location: BPC 210

Session 2 - 11:15am to 12:00pm

Session 2

The Visual Design of an Online Course

Presenter: James Pannafino, Millersville University

In the interactive design field user interface design (UI) refers to the visual style of elements that the user interacts with. This session will cover principles and theories in interface design that can help any educator improve the design of their online class. Topics like visual hierarchy, typography, style elements and others will be covered. This session will discuss topics from the ground up and no preexisting knowledge of design or technology is needed.

Learning Objectives: Participants will be exposed to visual design principles to improve their online course design. Participants will observe and discuss best practices in designing a online class within a visual context. Participants will learn basic technology tips and tricks to help in the visual design of their online course.

Location: BPC 204


Session 2

Why Active Learning Spaces?

Presenter: Teresa Hudson and Nobuyuki Yamamoto, West Chester University

In this session, presenters will define Active Learning Spaces, discuss use cases for the various room layouts, and explain the wireless presentation technology that runs behind the scenes. The session will include a hands-on demonstration, allowing attendees to experience one of WCU’s many Active Learning Spaces from a student perspective.

Learning Objectives: Attendees will acquire a better understanding of what Active Learning Spaces are, how they foster student collaboration, and are the driving force of the classroom of the future.

Location: BPC 205


Session 2

Should You Use Interactive Content? A Research Story

Presenter: Shannon Mrkich and Tom Pantazes, West Chester University

Join a lively simulation and discussion of a research study measuring the impact of interactional content delivery on student learning. You will participate in a mini-experiment that highlights what it means to interact with content. Then, we will compare your learning to an ongoing study measuring online composition students’ gains. Finally, we will discuss the creation of, pedagogical advantages of, and ideas for implementation of interactive content. (Please make sure you have an internet enabled device)

Learning Objectives: After the session participants will be able to: 1) describe content interaction in an online course, 2) identify significant content interactions, and 3) recognize pedagogical advantages of interactive content.

Location: BPC 208


Session 2

A Generalizable Course Assessment Plan for Improving Class Climate and Student Engagement

Presenter: Alison Gardiner-Shires, Patricia Davidson and Jennifer Bozeman, West Chester University

This interactive session will demonstrate how three faculty from different departments within West Chester University collaborated to develop a strategic, generalizable course assessment plan within three different types of classes across campus: general education, entry-level majors only, and senior level capstone. Small group discussions, fast feedback activities and multiple technology methods were used. Participants will be guided through the course assessment activities. Presenters will share lessons learned and the benefits of utilizing assessment techniques for improving class climate and enhancing student engagement.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session participants will be able to: 1) describe the benefits of having a strategic plan for course assessment; 2) implement a plan for course assessment in their own classes.

Location: BPC 210

Lunch and Poster Sessions - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Poster Session

Technology for K-12 Music Students with Special Needs: Music Educator Teacher Preparation

Presenter: Angela Guerriero, West Chester University

This session will explore the use of adaptive and assistive technology in an undergraduate course, Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs. The teacher education candidates enrolled in this class gained hands-on experience with some adaptive and assistive technology that is used in K-12 music classrooms, which in turn increased their engagement and collaboration in the course.

Learning Objectives: 1) Attendees will be able to describe at least two uses of technology in the undergraduate course, “Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs”. 2) Attendees will be able to list at least two apps, web-based technology, or specialized devices used in the undergraduate course, “Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs”. 3) Attendees will be able to describe how the use of this technology led to increased student engagement and collaboration.

Location: BPC Lobby


Poster Session

Using Technology to Improve Student Engagement and Assessment

Presenter: Christine Williams, West Chester University

The purpose of this presentation is to discuss how technology can be incorporated into the classroom to enhance student engagement and improve student learning through assessment. The first part of this presentation is designed to discuss apps that enhance student learning while creating a fun innovative classroom. The second part of this presentation is to discuss the usage of apps for assessment. We will discuss several apps the instructor can use for free to measure student learning. We will conclude the presentation with information on how to use the data from assessments to improve activities and exercises that will increase student learning.

Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to identify apps that improve student learning in their course(s). Attendees will be able to identify apps to use for assessing learning in their course(s). Attendees will learn how to adjust the course based on assessment feedback.

Location: BPC Lobby


Poster Session

Our Learning Roadmap: How D2L is Evolving at West Chester University

Presenter: Jessica Drass, Bonnie Young, LaTisha Griffin, and Lauren Keefe, West Chester University

Take a tour of the enhanced assessment, communication and accessibility features of D2L including a new resource, ReadSpeaker. Get in the driver’s seat and interact with D2L’s new interface, Daylight, which includes a responsive design and improved navigation.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the session, participants will be able to: 1) Describe upcoming D2L features 2) Explain the benefits of the responsiveness of the new D2L interface, Daylight.

Location: BPC Lobby


Poster Session

Leveraging D2L for Placement Exams

Presenter: LaTisha Griffin and Lauren Keefe, West Chester University

Placement exams are used at universities to determine the knowledge of incoming students to ensure they are placed into the appropriate mathematics, writing, and/or world language courses. Academic departments have also used placement exams to determine if students have the required knowledge to test out of a course and qualify for the next course in the progression. During this presentation we will address creating a university-wide placement exam. We will share the challenges with implementing an online assessment as well as the procedures used at our organization. We will cover planning the exam, developing the questions and creating the responsive exam in the LMS using release conditions. In addition, we will share details about the exam enrollment process and possible challenges.

Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to describe how a learning management system can be used to successfully deliver an institution or department-wide placement exam efficiently.

Location: BPC Lobby


Poster Session

Duplex Printing – A Student Driven Sustainability Initiative

Presenter: Shila Scott and Breahon Scott, West Chester University

The presentation focuses on a new sustainability initiative that makes double-sided printing the default in all major computer labs for students using RamPrint. Based on research conducted by HON 355/HIS 399 of similar initiatives on other campuses and our own data collected from students, we find that making duplex printing the default will not only increase University sustainability, but also save money and paper waste. This initiative is the collaborative work of the Technology Department, Administration and student leaders and is set to occur in Fall 2017 semester.

Learning Objectives:

Location: BPC Lobby


Poster Session

How to Use Storytelling to Transform Courses into Learning Experiences

Presenter: Mike Pennella, Ellucian

The human brain is hardwired to be engaged by storytelling, narrative voice and the use of metaphor. In our quest to move beyond designing functional online courses and to create to memorable learning experiences, we need to capitalize on this basic human drive. After a brief outlining of the underlying neuroscience, this session will focus on the various ways in which storytelling can be leveraged the design of online courses for any subject matter. This includes the concept of the heroic learner journey, the use of overarching metaphor and the effective use of storytelling and narrative in both course presentation and learner activity design.

Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to: Delineate why learners are hardwired to be engaged by the use of metaphor, narrative and storytelling in education Re-envision the course experience as an heroic learner journey Utilize the power of storytelling to create more engaging course frameworks and activities.

Location: BPC Lobby


Session 3 - 1:15pm to 2:00pm

Session 3

Lights, Camera, Action! How EdPuzzle Saved My Teaching

Presenter: Janet Josephson, Millersville University

EdPuzzle is an incredibly functional high-engagement tool that instructors can use to supplement their face-to-face instruction or use solely in a distance learning format. Ran out of time in class? No problem! Students not quite following your content in class? Online course in need of a makeover? Let me help you! Please bring your own device to this session and be ready for lights, camera, action!

Learning Objectives: Attendees will learn how to record video content and complete basic editing to their videos. Attendees will learn how to add comments, selection questions, and constructed response questions to their video. Attendees will evaluate how this video tool can be integrated into their face-to-face or online courses in order to increase student learning.

Location: BPC 204


Session 3

Preparing Pre-Service Secondary English Teachers to Model Digital Citizenship: Reflecting on a Co-Teaching Experiment

Presenter: Matthew Kruger-Ross and Pauline Schmidt, West Chester University

This session will highlight two faculty members' efforts to co-teach a technology methods course for pre-service secondary English teachers. We will share our technologically-infused planning, instructional, and assessment procedures from two perspectives: as an English education professor and an educational technology professor. Key components include our attempts to model digital citizenship through the use of mobile devices and BYOD, as well as a variety of multimodal and multimedia projects to assess student learning.

Learning Objectives: Attendees will learn the benefits and challenges of co-teaching. Attendees will experience the pedagogical strategies/choices as if pre-service teachers. Attendees will learn about existing efforts to prepare pre-service teachers to model digital citizenship for secondary students.

Location: BPC 205


Session 3

Using Turnitin for Quick Grading of Journals and Essays

Presenter: Larry Udell, West Chester University

The focus here will be using Turnitin's Grademark system to give useful feedback on writing assignments by relying only on a rubric for assessment. After a brief explanation of setting up the assignment on D2L, we will examine how to construct a new rubric or import an existing one into a particular assignment, and how to use it to inform students about their progress.

Learning Objectives: Attendees will learn 1) how to set up an assignment on D2L using Turnitin's Grademark tool, and 2) how to set up a simple and effective rubric that gives students useful feedback on their written assignment.

Location: BPC 208


Session 3

Don't Judge an eBook By its Print Edition

Presenter: Marc Drumm, West Chester University

While many students and faculty have discovered the advantages and conveniences of using eBooks in their courses, many haven’t moved past the perception of the eBook as just an electronic version of the printed textbook. In this session, we’ll examine how faculty are using Apple’s Multi-Touch format to create interactive eBooks with photo galleries, 3D images, animations, quizzes, and more to either complement or replace their course textbook. We’ll also look at how faculty are assessing their students by having them create their own Multi-Touch books.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the session, faculty will have learned: 1. The differences between the major eBook file formats. 2. How higher education faculty have created Multi-touch books for their courses. 3. How higher education faculty are assessing their students by having them create their own Multi-Touch books.

Location: BPC 210

Session 4 - 2:15pm to 3:00pm

Session 4

Use of Asynchronous Video to Engage Students and Create Instructor Presence

Presenter: Eric Hagan and Christopher Hewatt, DeSales University

Participants in this interactive presentation will see examples of research-based tools and methods for successfully incorporating asynchronous video elements in fully online undergraduate and graduate courses. Participants will be encouraged to share their perspectives, tools, and tips. The presenters will show examples of effective use of asynchronous video to engage students, build community, and create strong instructor presence. Topics addressed will include: when to use asynchronous (pre-recorded) vs. synchronous (live) video, when to use various styles of asynchronous video (on-screen instructor vs. voiced-over slides), and technological challenges for instructors and students.

Learning Objectives: Participants will: (1) Learn the benefits of video in online instruction. (2) Understand the pros and cons of asynchronous vs. synchronous video and the various styles of asynchronous video. (3) Become familiar with tools for creating compelling asynchronous video presentations

Location: BPC 204


Session 4

Classroom Technology: Digital Tools for Student Engagement, Interactivity, and Collaboration

Presenter: Iliana Pagan-Teitelbaum, West Chester University

This session introduces two free online digital tools that can be used to engage students by increasing interaction and collaboration in the classroom: Padlet (an interactive multimedia digital wall) and Slack (a cloud-based team collaboration tool). The learning outcomes of this session are: 1) digital literacy, employ a new digital tools to engage students in new forms of collaboration and interaction; and 2) instructional design, develop scaffolded structures to help students learn and apply digital-literacy skills to share ideas and interact through classroom technology. BYOD for hands-on work.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session participants will be able to: 1) Digital Literacy. Employ two new digital tools to engage students in new forms of collaboration and interaction. 2) Instructional Design. Develop scaffolded structures to help students learn and apply digital-literacy skills to share ideas and interact through classroom technology.

Location: BPC 205


Session 4

Using Flipped Learning in the Education Capstone

Presenter: Mary Jo Pierantozzi, Other

The Capstone course is the culminating course of the Education program. Its focus is on the four domains of Charlotte Danielson. Students have been working with the domains throughout the program so this gives them an opportunity to delve deeper. The course is a hybrid so the Flipped Learning Model is utilized. In this session, the presenter will describe the Flipped Learning Model, offer the rationale for using the Flipped Learning model in Capstone, demonstrate how the flipped modules are designed and delivered, and discuss what occurs when students meet in their Professional Learning Communities to process and reflect on their learning.

Learning Objectives: Attendees, not familiar with flipped learning, will gain an understanding of this concept. Attendees will recognize how the flipped learning model can be utilized in a higher education environment. Attendees will be able to link to the components of the flipped learning modules used for this Capstone class.

Location: BPC 208


Session 4

Experiences with VoiceThread - Creating Meaningful Virtual Communication and Multifaceted Engagement

Presenter: Veronica Wilbur, West Chester University

Have you ever considered using VoiceThread to promote communication, connection, and collaboration in your online or hybrid class? Come to this session and learn how to creatively use VoiceThread application in these types of courses. Experience with the application in two graduate nursing courses will be discussed. Overall, the students who used VoiceThread exhibited a higher level of scholarship, enhanced critical thinking and increased engagement. Participants in this session can expect to actively engage in a Voice Thread example.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session participants will be able to: 1) Describe how VoiceThread can create a different level of student engagement 2) Identify at least one appropriate student assignment that can be used within the VoiceThread platform

Location: BPC 210