View Text Only Version

Twardowski Career Development Center

Before Your Interview

Contact Us  

Twardowski Career Development Center

Address:
225 Lawrence Center
705 S. New Street
West Chester, PA 19383


Phone: 610-436-2501
General: cdc@wcupa.edu
Employers: recruit@wcupa.edu


Hours:
Monday-Friday: 8:00am-4:30pm (Fall & Spring Semesters)
Monday-Friday: 8:00am-4:00pm (Summer)

The career center follows the University’s calendar for holidays, delays, and closures.


Drop-In Hours (no appointment needed):
Monday-Friday: 1:00-3:00pm


About The Center & Staff Directory

Before Your Interview

  • Research the Organization
  • Be prepared to talk about anything on your resume. Relate your skills and experiences to the position and organization.
  • Prepare three or more "Success Stories." Emphasize your strengths through projects, jobs, or other situations where you were directly involved in the success of an item. Highlight your Career Readiness skills.
  • Confirm all details. Ask for the correct street address, approximately how long to plan for, and who you will be meeting with. Plan a route in advance, and either check your directions and parking or figure out public transportation options ahead of time. If possible, do a 'practice run' to the interview area.
  • Prepare questions to ask the employer at the end of your interview. You want to get as much information as possible to ensure this is the right opportunity for you, but avoid asking about salary and benefits.
  • PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE! You can schedule an in-person mock interview by appointment with a staff member in the TCDC, or complete an online mock interview 24/7 by using Ram Career Network.
  • Prior to any interview, conduct research on the salary range for the type of position and geographic location of interest to be best prepared for an interviewer's questions about your salary expectations.

Researching Salary Information

Prior to any interview, conduct research on the salary range for the type of position and geographic location of interest to be best prepared for an interviewer's questions about your salary expectations.

Salary is what most people think of first when researching compensation. Be certain to consider other forms of compensation, particularly benefits, such as health care and retirement planning, before making a final decision about whether a position's salary will meet your needs and expectations.

Salary Information Websites

How to Handle Requests for Salary History

When an employer requests a salary history (what you've earned in the past) or salary requirements (what you hope to earn in this job), many job seekers find themselves at a loss. You don't want to price yourself out of a job, but you don't want the employer to offer less than the going rate for the position. So what's the right answer?

  • Don't include salary history on your resume. Handle the request at the end of your cover letter.
  • Respond to the salary history question positively without giving a specific amount. (Example: "I'm earning in the mid-40s.")
  • Research the market value for the position and for someone with your skills and background; give at least a $3,000-$5,000 range when providing salary requirements.
  • You may also respond to the salary requirement question by writing "salary is negotiable" or "I would be delighted to discuss specific salary details commensurate with my experience as part of the interview process."
  • Be prepared to respond to this question in an interview. Carry a list of your positions in reverse chronological order, including the name of the company, your title, a synopsis of your duties, and, lastly, a general compensation amount (e.g. mid-40s).
  • Don't lie about your salary history. Employers may verify salary history through reference checks.
  • Salary requests are difficult for all job searchers to handle, not just new college grads. The key is to shift the focus, politely but firmly, from what you made in the past to competitive compensation for the position you want.

Some of this information is courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.


Learn More About Interviewing


Back to top of page.