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University Writing Council Conference

UniversityWriting Council

Contact University Writing Council Conference  

University Writing Council Conference

Dr. Margaret Ervin
Associate Professor of English
FHG Library Room 251
West Chester, PA 19382


Phone: 610-430-5664
Email: mervin@wcupa.edu


Summer 2018 Hours

Monday to Thursday: 12:00pm - 3:00pm
Wednesday and Thursday: 7:00pm - 10:00pm ONLINE ONLY
Friday, Saturday, Sunday: Closed

University Writing Council Conference

First Annual Writing and Critical Thinking Conference
for West Chester University Faculty
August 25th, 2017 - 9AM - 4:30PM
Main Hall, Room 200

Please join the University Writing Council (UWC) and the UWC Advisory Board on August 25th on the Main Campus of West Chester University for a series of workshops, working groups, and discussions about university writing and its role in stimulating critical and innovative thinking for our students. Refreshments will be served and reply is required to attend.

RSVP by August 18, 2017

8:30 am – Coffee and pastries served - Main Hall - 200

9:00 - 9:50 am – Keynote: Threshold Concepts for Writing Instruction (Dr. Tim Dougherty) - Main Hall 200

10:00 am– 11:20 am Concurrent Sessions

These concurrent sessions repeat at 10:00 am and 11:30 am. This way by attending Session A and Session B, you can attend two out of the three sessions, or alternatively you can attend one concurrent session and not the other. We are mindful of how valuable your time is the last Friday before classes start.

10:00 - 11:20 Concurrent Session A

A.1 - Main Hall 202

Strategies and Technologies for Feedback: Do I Comment on Everything?

Often we get started reading student writing with the eye of a copy editor, correcting grammar mistakes as we go, and then wind up with a few global comments. Alternatively, we may use a rubric to grade the essay as a whole. During this session, we will give you suggestions for giving targeted feedback on drafts, before students hand in their final draft, using widely available technologies such as Google docs.

A.2 - Main Hall 213

Developing Rubrics for Grading Writing

This session will introduce you to two different kinds of rubrics, “holistic" and “analytic.” An analytic rubric provides a score for each attribute of the writing, for instance, organization, style, citation format. A “holistic” rubric describes the attributes being considered but assesses the work using those attributes as descriptors, without grading each attribute separately. You will be given sample rubrics you can use this semester, and we will discuss the pros and cons of each type of rubric.

A.3 - Main Hall 214

Designing Writing Assignments that Engage Deep Critical Thinking

This session will help you reflect upon the outcomes of the writing assignments on your syllabus, so you can see what critical thinking students are embedded in your existing assignments. You will also learn techniques for enhancing the critical thinking work students need to do in order to make the grade in your course. Rubrics and sample assignments will be provided.

11:30 – 12:50 PM – Concurrent Session B

B.1 - Main Hall 202

Strategies and Technologies for Feedback: Do I Comment on Everything?

Often we get started reading student writing with the eye of a copy editor, correcting grammar mistakes as we go, and then wind up with a few global comments. Alternatively, we may use a rubric to grade the essay as a whole. During this session, we will give you suggestions for giving targeted feedback on drafts, before students hand in their final draft, using widely available technologies such as Google docs.

B.2 - Main Hall 213

Developing Rubrics for Grading Writing

This session will introduce you to two different kinds of rubrics, “holistic" and “analytic.” An analytic rubric provides a score for each attribute of the writing, for instance, organization, style, citation format. A “holistic” rubric describes the attributes being considered but assesses the work using those attributes as descriptors, without grading each attribute separately. You will be given sample rubrics you can use this semester, and we will discuss the pros and cons of each type of rubric.

B.3 - Main Hall 214

Designing Writing Assignments that Engage Deep Critical Thinking

This session will help you reflect upon the outcomes of the writing assignments on your syllabus, so you can see what critical thinking students are embedded in your existing assignments. You will also learn techniques for enhancing the critical thinking work students need to do in order to make the grade in your course. Rubrics and sample assignments will be provided.

1:00 - 2:00–Lunch in Main Hall 200

2:15– 4:30 – UWC and Advisory Board Working Group Kickoff Meetings

These meetings start work that will continue over the next six months to a year. Members of the working groups are already working together in some instances, but all who would like to get involved at any level, or who are just interested in giving input during the first meeting are welcome.

WG.1 Writing Emphasis Course Design (Justin Rademaekers) This working group will discuss recent research on critical thinking and ask attendees to develop effective writing to learn assignments based on  the kind of critical thinking instructors want to activate for their students. This working group will lead to the development of assignments and assessment materials to implement in the fall semester.

WG.2 Writing Support for Black Men at WCU (Michael Burns and Juanita Wooten) This working group will kick off an initiative to support black men at WCU to become advocates for themselves and others through composing texts, both visual and written. There is currently no support network of this kind on campus, so this working group will be a place to generate ideas and set goals for 2017-18.

WG.3 Writing Instruction in the Health Sciences (Margaret Ervin, Sandy Sarcona, and Tricia Davidson) This working group will pick up with a project started in 2016-17 to support student in Nutrition and Dietetics who are writing personal statements. A second health sciences initiative is online writing center support and library support for the Doctoral Nursing Program. This afternoon session will be spent identifying areas of common concern and areas where library and writing center support can enhance writing instruction in the Health Sciences.

WG.4 Transfer from First-Year Writing Throughout the Curriculum (Tim Dougherty) This working group will think more deeply about how the outcomes, keywords, and core concepts from the first-year writing curriculum can helpfully scaffold writing instruction across the curriculum. We’ll begin to lay the groundwork for more continuity and cohesion in the culture of writing instruction here at WCU.