Undergraduate Catalog

2012 – 2013


2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Archive

Office of Admissions
Emil H. Messikomer Hall
100 W. Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA 19383
Phone: 610-436-3411
Fax: 610-436-2907
ugadmiss@wcupa.edu


Revised August 2012

Academic Programs

Department of Languages and Cultures

109 Main Hall
610-436-2700
Jerome M. Williams, Chairperson
Anne-Marie Moscatelli, Assistant Chairperson

PROFESSORS: Braidotti, Landwehr, Patton, Pauly, Schlau, Speh, Van Liew, Varricchio, Williams

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Grove, Moscatelli, Sage

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Amer, Cabrera, Campillo-Fenoll, Crosby, Hernández, Sanz-Sánchez, Smidt

INSTRUCTOR: Rosso

Programs Offered

BACHELOR OF ARTS:
French, German, Latin*, Russian, and Spanish

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH ELECTIVE CERTIFICATION:
French, German, Latin*, Russian, and Spanish

The Instructional I Certificate in a language qualifies the holder to teach his or her major language in the public schools (kindergarten through 12th grade) of Pennsylvania.

Minors: French, German, Italian, Latin, linguistics, Russian, and Spanish

* Effective fall 2010, no new students will be admitted to the Latin major.

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE B.A. PROGRAMS

120 semester hours

  1. General ed. requirements, see pages 38-44 (48 semester hours)
  2. Major language courses (30 semester hours)
  3. FRENCH - FRE 102**, 201-202, 301, 302, 303, and 304. Additional courses to complete the 30 credits, taken under advisement.
    *For French and Spanish majors, FRE 101 and SPA 101–201 may only fulfill general education student elective requirements, and/or overall graduation credits. These courses will not fulfill their respective major requirements.

    GERMAN - GER 101-102, 201-202, 303, 307, and 350-351. Additional courses to complete the 30 credits, taken under advisement.

    LATIN - LAT 101-102, 201, 202, 303, and 406. Additional Latin and Classical language courses to complete the 30 credits, taken under advisement.

    RUSSIAN - RUS 101-102 or 103, 201-202 or 203, 301-302, 303-304, 305, 306, 402, and 407-408. Additional courses to complete the 30 credits, taken under advisement.

    SPANISH** - SPA 202, 301-302, 315, 320 or 321, 330-331, 365, 444 and any one 400-level course. Additional courses to complete the 30 credits, taken under advisement.
    **For French and Spanish majors, FRE 101 and SPA 101–201 may only fulfill general education requirements, student electives, and/or overall graduation credits. These courses will not fulfill their respective major requirements.

  4. Second language (0-12 semester hours)
    Demonstration of proficiency in a second language through the Intermediate II level, by placement testing or course work through 202 (credit by examination and/or CLEP permitted).
  5. Two cognate courses (6 semester hours)
    1. LIN 230 or ENG 230 or LAN 327 (3)
    2. LAT 101 (3) or history or political science or geography, or any other approved course (see student handbook)
  6. Electives (to complete 120 semester hours)

The number of hours available depends on the student's level of second language proficiency. The student may choose to apply some of these to additional advanced courses in the major area or to continue second or third language study.

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE ELECTIVE CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS (formerly B.S.Ed.)

123 semester hours

  1. General ed. requirements, see pages 38-44 (48 semester hours)
    ANT 102 and PSY 100 are required and will count toward the general education requirements.
  2. Language concentration (30 semester hours)

    FRENCH - FRE 102**, 201-202, 301, 302, 303, and 304. Additional French courses to complete the 30 credits.

    GERMAN - GER 101-102, 201-202, 303, 307, and 350-351. Additional German courses to complete the 30 credits.

    LATIN - LAT 101-102, 201, 202, 301, 303, and 406. Additional Latin and Classical language courses to complete the 30 credits.

    RUSSIAN - RUS 101-102 or 103, 201-202 or 203, 301-302, 303-304, 305, and 407-408.

    SPANISH** - SPA 202, 301-302, 315, 320 or 321 or equivalent, 330-331, and 365, amd 444. One 400-level Spanish course to complete the 30 credits.

    **For French and Spanish majors, FRE 101 and SPA 101–201 may only fulfill general education requirements, student electives, and/or overall graduation credits. These courses will not fulfill their respective major requirements.

  3. Pennsylvania certification in languages K–12 (36 semester hours)
    Effective August 2013 students must complete professional education sequence of EDA 103, EDM 349, EDP 250 and 355, EDP 349 or PSY 382, EDR 345 or 347, and following formal admission EDA 303, EDS 306, LAN 401+ (LAT 301 for Latin majors), EDS 411/412.

    Students must pass the Praxis PPST exams (reading, math, and writing) before formal admission to teacher education and student teaching. Students must take two mathematics courses and two English courses, one in writing and one in literature. See other requirements on pages pages 162-163. Students are required to take the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Oral Proficiency Test and Writing Proficiency Test during student teaching.

    Note on Praxis II Exams: In order to enroll in the student teaching internship (EDS 411/412), certification candidates must first take (and ideally, though not necessarily pass) the following Praxis II Exams: a) the appropriate exam in the language of specialization (e.g., see list below), and b) the Fundamental Subjects: Content Knowledge Exam required for all K-12 certification candidates by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (#0511, passing score is 150). Candidates must pass all Praxis II Exams in order to be recommended for certification; passing scores on these computerized tests are French (#5174): 162; German (#5183): 163; Spanish (#5195): 168.

  4. PDE prerequisites and requirement for program (9 semester hours)
    LAN 327 or LIN 230 (3), language area cognate (3), second math course (3)

See the Teacher Certification Programs section of this catalog for an explanation of related requirements.

Minor in Language (18 semester hours)

Minors are available in French, German, Italian, Latin, Spanish, and Russian.

  1. The minor concentration begins with the language sequence of 101-102 (or 103), 201-202 (203 or 205), unless the student tests at a higher level through the online placement exam. Students placing out of beginning courses must still complete 18 hours.

  2. A minimum grade of B is required in both 101 and 102 in order to pursue the minor.
  3. Beyond the 202 sequence, courses at the 300 and 400 levels in the same language must be taken under advisement. Courses in English at any level are not acceptable.

The Study Abroad Program

Courses in French are offered at various approved programs in French-speaking countries. They are designed to give students a first-hand acquaintance with Francophone culture and enable them to achieve an active command of the language. These programs are open to any student enrolled at West Chester University who has completed the equivalent of two years of college French. Students may receive up to 30 credits for a full two semesters of study abroad. Courses are conducted entirely in French.

The Guadalajara Summer Program, in affiliation with the University of San Diego, offers courses at all levels of Spanish proficiency and in English on culture, politics, art, and more. Students are invited to participate at any stage of the Spanish major or minor. Residency with host families enhances the classroom experience and expands conversational skills.

The Seville, Spain, program, in affiliation with International University Studies (IUS), offers courses that also lead to completion of the major and minor. Students may take courses during the academic year or the summer.

Study abroad programs are also available in Germany (summer in Berlin and academic year in Marburg), Italy, Russia, and in most Spanish-speaking countries (including summer study in Costa Rica; Guadalajara, Mexico; and Seville and Salamanca, Spain).
The department’s Web homepage is the official site for all study abroad programs and updates.

Language Testing and Placement

The Department of Languages and Cultures provides online and onsite placement testing for students entering the University. Based on the results of the tests given and an analysis of past experience, the department will suggest the level of language a student should enter. The placement test does not confer academic credit; it is taken for the express purpose of indicating the level at which a student should begin his or her study in the language. Students do not receive University credit for any language course they place out of on the placement test. Credit may be obtained by taking the CLEP tests or credit by exam for two such courses before enrolling in a higher level course. Minors and majors in a language must still complete the courses required by the department.

For more information, students can visit http://www.wcupa.edu/_academics/sch_cas.flg/placement.asp

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ARABIC
Symbol: ARB

101 Modern Arabic I (Elementary) (3) Introduction to basic written and spoken Arabic language and culture; fundamentals of grammar and oral practice.

102 Modern Arabic II (Elementary) (3) Continuation of spoken and written Arabic for students who have completed the equivalent of ARB 101.

103 Intensive Elementary Arabic (6) Intensive introduction to modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, writing, and reading. Equivalent to ARB 101 and 102 combined.

201 Modern Arabic III (3) Continuation of ARB 102 to further develop the four language skills and comprehend key aspects of the Arab-speaking world.

202 Modern Arabic IV (Intermediate II) (3) Continuation of practice in comprehending spoken and written Arabic for practical application.

205 Intensive Intermediate Arabic (6) To enhance students’ ability to read, discuss, and write on various contemporary topics. The course is equivalent to the competency level achieved in ARB 201 and 202.

301 Advanced Modern Standard Arabic I (3) An advanced course in Arabic language. It emphasizes a skill-building approach that covers the essentials of listening, speaking, reading, writing, structure, and understanding, as well as analyzes cultural patterns reflected in language use of speakers of Arabic. PREREQ: ARB 202.

302 Advanced Modern Standard Arabic II (3) This course builds on ARB 301, emphasizing reading and writing skills. It also focuses on helping students acquire content to express critical thinking skills using Arabic. PREREQ: ARB 301.

CHINESE
Symbol: CHI

101 Elementary Chinese I (3) Introduction to elementary Mandarin Chinese with focuses on hearing, speaking, reading, and writing to develop basic competence. Emphasis is on integration of all language skills.

102 Elementary Chinese II (3) Continuation of basic language skills in speaking, reading, and writing modern Chinese with an emphasis on solid training at the beginning level. The course focuses on providing students with the basic vocabulary needed for daily conversation. Elementary reading and limited writing introduced. PREREQ: CHI 101.

201 Intermediate Chinese I (3) Third level of Mandarin Chinese, stressing advanced pronunciation with emphasis on intensive conversation and writing. Further development of audio-lingual proficiency, with increased reading and writing skills. PREREQ: CHI 102.

202 Intermediate Chinese II (3) Continuation of Mandarin Chinese communicative skills through study and review of grammatical structures. Composition and conversation, with focuses on spoken and written communicative competence. Reading assignments and practices executed in Chinese characters. PREREQ: CHI 201.

301 Advanced Chinese I (3) Third-year Mandarin Chinese studies to continue focus on four aspects of languages skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course helps to expand the students’ understanding of important linguistic structures. Students will be exposed intensively to both traditional and simplified Chinese characters, and gradually introduced to the formal written-style expressions, in addition to those of spoken style. PREREQ: CHI 202.

302 Advanced Chinese II (3) Second half of Mandarin Chinese studies to continue focus on four aspects of languages skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing to introduce topics of interest to college students and adult learners. The course helps to expand the students’ understanding of important linguistic structures. Students will be exposed intensively to the formal written-style expressions, in addition to those of spoken style. PREREQ: CHI 301.

Symbol: ECH

380 Chinese Business Culture (3) A study of how traditional and modern Chinese culture and thought affect business operations and behaviors in China.
Culture cluster

FRENCH

Symbol: FRE

101-102 Elementary French I-II (3) (3) Fundamentals of French grammar, syntax, and pronunciation at the novice and low intermediate levels, with emphasis on acquiring skills in reading and listening, speaking and writing. Language laboratory work is required. Taught in French.

201-202 Intermediate French I-II (3) (3) Development of intermediate level skills in the language, using dialogues, compositions, samples of language structure, readings, and other cultural source materials, including film, media, and the Internet. Language laboratory work is required. Taught in French. PREREQ: FRE 102 or placement.

302 Phonetics and Advanced Oral French (3) Intensive practice in spoken French to develop skills in pronunciation and in listening comprehension. Introduction to French phonetics.

303 Francophone Civilization (3) (In French) A survey of the social, political, economic, and educational structures of France, along with an introduction to the artistic contributions of the French, particularly in the 20th century.

304 Readings in Francophone Literature (3) The reading and analysis of representative selections of French prose (fiction and nonfiction), poetry, essays, and plays.

305 Advanced Grammar and Stylistics (3) The more complex grammatical and syntactical structures of the language, with particular attention to stylistics. Practice in writing compositions on a more sophisticated and advanced level with emphasis on correct usage. Writing emphasis course

315 French for Oral Proficiency (3) Total immersion course intended for students with a functional knowledge of French. Emphasis on oral and aural communication using real-life situations to develop fluency.

350 French Cinema (3) A study of French films as they reflect culture, language, and ideology, as well as film as art.

401 Commercial French (3) A study of the French economic and business systems, and extensive practice in using forms and expressions frequently used in French business correspondence.

409 Women and Men in French Literature (3) (In English) Works by women and men novelists, poets, or dramatists that present striking images of love and conflict between the sexes. Also a women's and gender studies course.
Culture cluster

410 French Theater to 1900: In Context (3) A study of the French theater from its beginnings to the 19th century in the contexts of the times. Reading and analysis of representative plays from the various periods.

412 Narrative Prose (3) An examination of the evolution of French prose in the nouvelle, the conte, the récit and the novel from their earliest beginnings to the present.

413 French Poetry (3) A history of French poetry and a study of its versification. Practice in the recitation of French poems and close textual analysis, and discussion of selected works.

415 Modern French Literature in Context (3) A study of the evolution of modern literary genres, beginning with the revolt of the generation of 1900, through Dada and Surrealism and the writers of the absurd to the present.

420-421-422 Topics in French Literature (3) (3) (3) Each topics course provides an in-depth study of a significant aspect of French culture, art, or literature, its history and influences, and/or its principal exponents, creative artists, and advocates. Topics will be announced annually by the French faculty.
This course may be taken again for credit.

440 Writing French Children’s Stories (3) This writing workshop for advanced French students requires composing five children’s stories in French and studying narrative structure and techniques that develop description, dialogue, character, and plot. Group participation through critical feedback in D2L.

Offerings in English (EFR): Interdisciplinary and Culture Cluster Courses

EFR 320 French Civilization (3) (In English) A study of France's political and educational systems and economic and religious institutions with emphasis on contemporary aspects.
Culture cluster
Approved interdisciplinary course

EFR 330 Francophone Civilization (3) (in English) A multidisciplinary approach to the cultures and civilizations of Francophone countries in West Africa and the Caribbean, including historical and geographical factors, religious and sociological structures, and literary and artistic productions. Taught in English.
Culture cluster

EFR 350 French Civilization on Film (3) (In English) A study of French history and culture as reflected in French and French-speaking cinema.
Culture cluster

EFR 401 French Business Culture (3) (in English) The course offers an insight into the operation of modern businesses in France and the European Union by addressing economic systems, management styles, customs, and manners in an international context.
Culture cluster

GERMAN

Symbol: GER

101-102 Elementary German I-II (3) (3) Fundamentals of German grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Introduction to German culture through easy-reading texts. The audio-lingual method is employed. Language laboratory drill is required.

201-202 Intermediate German I-II (3) (3) Review of grammar and syntax. Readings in German literature as a basis for class discussion in German and practice in composition. Language laboratory drill required for remedial work only. PREREQ: GER 102 or placement.

NOTE: All advanced literature and civilization courses include lectures and discussion in the foreign language, and all student papers and examinations must be written in the foreign language.

303 Advanced German Grammar and Composition (3) The more complex grammatical and syntactical structures of the language with particular attention to stylistics. Practice in writing compositions on a more advanced level with emphasis on correct usage. PREREQ: GER 202 or equivalent.

306 Survey of German Literature II (3) German literature from 1800 to the present. PREREQ: GER 202 or equivalent.

307   Advanced Oral German (3) Intensive drill in the oral use of the language and phonetics to develop proficiency in listening comprehension and speaking. PREREQ: GER 202 or equivalent.

310   Business German (3) For students with an interest in a business career, the course introduces trends and policies that influence German business practices, with an overview of the economy. No prior knowledge of business or economics is required. PREREQ: GER 303 or 307.

315 Developing Oral Proficiency (3) Specific discursive strategies will be learned and practiced, with special emphasis placed on narration and description, two essential required components of oral proficiency testing. PREREQ: GER 303 or 307.

322   Austrian Civilization (3) This course is almost identical to EGE 323; slightly different readings in German will be offered. Discussions are in German.

350-351   German Culture I-II (3) (3) A cultural history of Germany with a focus on philosophy, literature, and the arts. GER 350 covers the Middle Ages to 1871. GER 351 studies the 20th century. PREREQ: GER 303 or 307.

401   The Age of Goethe (3) German literary doctrines and masterpieces of the periods of Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, and Classicism. PREREQ: GER 202 or equivalent.

403 20th-Century German Masterpieces (3) An in-depth analysis of the prose works of major 20th-century German writers, including Kafka, Mann, Hesse, Anna Seghers, and Christa Wolf. A close reading of these works will consider such narrative techniques as point-of-view, ambiguity, and irony as well as such German intellectual and artistic contributions as Expressionism, psychoanalysis, and the Bildungsroman. Taught in conjunction with EGE 403.

404 German Artists as Social Conscience: Postwar German Literature and Film (3) An examination of the political and social issues of contemporary Germany through an analysis of literary and cinematic texts. Discussion topics include the Holocaust, Nazism, the Second World War, the Economic Miracle, the Cold War, terrorism, the feminist and peace movements, atomic warfare, and German reunification and its aftermath. Taught in conjunction with EGE 404.

405 German Film from Expressionism to the New German Cinema (3) An analysis of German films from Expressionism to the present. Films will be examined in terms of their political and social context and as works of art. Directors include Fritz Lang, Murnau, Wiene, Fassbinder, Herzog, Schlondorff, von Trotta, and Wenders. Taught in conjunction with EGE 405. Writing emphasis course.

407 German Lyric Poetry (3) Modern German poetry of pre- and post-World War II.

408 Masterpieces of German Theatre (3) A study of the various trends of 20th- century German drama in the Federal Republic, the former GDR, Switzerland, and Austria, with a focus on expressionism, epic theater, and documentary theater. Taught in conjunction with EGE 408.

410 Independent Studies in German Language and Literature (3) Topics for advanced students only. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

411 Seminar in German (3) Independent study and research for upper-division students. Topics announced annually by the German faculty. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

412 Seminar in German (3) Independent study and research for upper-division students. Topic announced annually by the German faculty. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

413 Impact of the Holocaust on Literature and Film (3) This course studies causes and effects of the Holocaust through literary, philosophical, and cinematic works of post-war Europe and America. Taught in conjunction with EGE 409.

420 German for Reading (3) Designed to help students develop the skills needed to read German scholarly writing in fields such as philosophy, history, the sciences, and the arts. It is also suitable for students preparing to take a German reading test or doing archival research. PREREQ: GER 201 or equivalent.

Offerings in English (EGE): Interdisciplinary and Culture Cluster Courses

EGE 323 Austrian Civilization 1848-1938 (3) An interdisciplinary study of Austrian civilization, focusing on Vienna 1848-1938. The relationship of selected cultural and intellectual developments to their political and social contexts. This course employs the perspective of many disciplines but is specifically concerned with the humanities and visual arts.
Culture cluster
Approved interdisciplinary course

EGE 403 20th-Century German Masterpieces (3) An in-depth analysis of the prose works of three major 20th-century German writers, including Kafka, Mann, Hesse, Anna Seghers, and Christa Wolf. A close reading of these works will consider such narrative techniques as point-of-view, ambiguity, and irony as well as such German intellectual and artistic contributions as Expressionism, psychoanalysis, and the Bildungsroman. No knowledge of German required.
Culture cluster

EGE 404 German Artists as Social Conscience: Postwar German Literature and Film (3) An examination of the political and social issues of contemporary Germany through an analysis of literary and cinematic texts. Discussion topics include the Holocaust, Nazism, the Second World War, the Economic Miracle, the Cold War, terrorism, the feminist and peace movements, atomic warfare, and German reunification and its aftermath. No knowledge of German required.
Culture cluster

EGE 405 A Survey of German Film (3) (arts elective course) An analysis of German films from Expressionism to the present. We shall examine the films in terms of their political and social context and as works of art. Directors include Fritz Lang, Murnau, Wiene, Fassbinder, Herzog, Schlondorff, von Trotta, and Wenders. No knowledge of German required.
Culture cluster. Writing emphasis course.

EGE 408 Modern German Drama (3) A study of the various trends of 20th century German drama in the Federal Republic, the former GDR, Switzerland, and Austria, with a focus on expressionism, epic theater, and documentary theater. Taught in English. No knowledge of German required.
Culture cluster

EGE 409 Impact of the Holocaust on Literature and Film (3) This course studies the causes and effects of the Holocaust through literary, philosophical, and cinematic works of post-war Europe and America. No knowledge of German required.
Culture cluster

ANCIENT GREEK
Symbol: GRE

101-102 Elementary Greek I-II (3) (3) Forms, grammar, and idioms of Attic and Koine Greek. Readings in Septuagint and New Testament Greek.

201 Intermediate Greek I (3) Readings in Socratic dialogues of Plato.

202 Intermediate Greek II (3) Homeric prosody and grammar. Reading of selected portions of the Homeric Poems.

301-302 Greek Reading I-II (3) (3) Readings in prose and verse. Authors usually selected by genre.
This course may be taken again for credit.

ANCIENT HEBREW

Symbol: HBW

101-102 Elementary Biblical Hebrew I-II (3) (3) Forms, grammar, and idioms of Biblical Hebrew. Selected readings.

201-202 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I-II (3) (3) Readings in the prose and poetic documents of the Biblia Hebraica.

ITALIAN

Symbol: ITA

101-102 Elementary Italian I-II (3) (3) Intensive drill, in class and in the language laboratory, with pronunciation, intonation, and basic linguistic patterns. Introduction to Italian culture through basic dialogues and easy-reading texts.

201-202 Intermediate Italian I-II (3) (3) Review of Italian grammar and syntax. Introduction to Italian literature through short readings of intermediate difficulty. Composition and conversation in Italian based on reading assignments. Language laboratory for remedial drill. PREREQ: ITA 102 or equivalent.

301-302 Advanced Italian Grammar and Conversation I-II (3) (3) Review and mastery of Italian grammar, with special emphasis on syntactic structure and stylistics, along with intensive oral drills to develop proficiency in listening comprehension and speaking ability. PREREQ: ITA 202.

321 Italian Culture (3) An overview of Italian geography, history, and regional cultures, along with its literary, philosophical, scientific, and artistic manifestations and contributions to the world. PREREQ: ITA 202.

360 Italian Cinema (3) A history of Italian cinema, as seen through representative works of each period/movement PREREQ: ITA 202.

400 Survey of Italian Literature (3) High points in Italian literature, touching upon the most important writers from the beginning to the present day. PREREQ ITA 301-302.

401 Introduction to Dante, Petrarca, and Boccaccio (3) A general discussion on the importance and influence of these writers on Italian and European literature and thought, as seen through some of their representative works. PREREQ ITA 301-302.

402 Contemporary Italian Literature (3) A survey of contemporary Italian authors through some representative selections of their works. PREREQ ITA 301-302.

410 Independent Studies in Italian Language and Literature (3) Special topics for advanced students only. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

411 Seminar in Italian I (3) Independent study and research for upper-division students. Topics announced annually by the Italian faculty. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

412 Seminar in Italian II (3) Independent study and research for upper-division students. Topics announced annually by the Italian faculty. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

Offerings in English (EIT): Culture Cluster Courses

EIT 321 Images of Italy(3) (In English) An overview of Italian geography, history, and regional cultures, along with its literary, philosophical, scientific, and artistic manifestations and contributions to the world.
Culture cluster

EIT 360 Italy on Film (3) (In English) A history of Italian cinema, as seen through representative works of each period.
Culture cluster

Japanese
Symbol: JPN

101 Elementary Japanese I (3) Students will study idiomatic expressions and the fundamentals of grammar. Vocabulary acquisition, writing system (hiragana and katakana) and some kanji. The relationship between language and culture will be introduced and emphasized.

102 Elementary Japanese II (3) Develops further the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese, and emphasizes the structure of the language. Lectures, language laboratory, oral practice, and small group work. PREREQ: JPN 101 or equivalent.

201 Intermediate Japanese I (3) Spoken and written Japanese. Course is designed to reinforce the fundamentals of the japans language skills introduced in the elementary level. It also aims at developing the functional ability to communicate in Japanese beyond the survival level. PREREQ: JPN 102 or equivalent.

202 Intermediate Japanese II (3) Acquisition of oral skills, with the class conducted entirely in Japanese. To develop the ability to behave appropriately and effectively in Japanese culture and society. Expansion of conversational skills. The course will also help develop cultural sensitivity, which is crucial in conducting intercultural communication. PREREQ: JPN 201 or equivalent.

301 Conversational Japanese (3) A continuation of JPN 202. Students develop increased communication skills and greater understanding of Japanese grammar. This course will assist students in improving reading, writing, and understanding the Japanese language, as well as refining pronunciation and other communication skills. PREREQ: JPN 202.

302 Conversational Japanese (3) Improvement of Japanese language proficiency with focus on conversation for students who have completed the first five semesters (or equivalent) of Japanese. A review of kanji and fundamental reading strategies in order to enhance students’ verbal skills, with conversation centered around authentic materials, including newspaper articles on relevant social or political issues, short essays, and short articles from academic texts.

LATIN
Symbol: LAT

101-102 Elementary Latin I-II (3) (3) Forms, syntax, and idioms of classical Latin. Selected readings.

201 Cicero (3) Selections from the orations, letters, and essays. PREREQ: LAT 101 and 102, or two years of secondary school Latin.

202 Vergil (3) Reading and analysis of celebrated portions of the Aeneid. The nature of Latin epic poetry. PREREQ: LAT 201 or three years of secondary school Latin.

NOTE: LAT 202 or permission of instructor is the prerequisite for all following courses in Latin.

301 Teaching of Latin (3) Introduction to the problems, methods, and materials in the teaching of Latin. Observation and participation in K-12 Latin classrooms.

302 The Latin Lyric Poets (3) Latin lyric poetry through readings in Catullus, Carmina, Horace's Odes and Epodes. Practice in the composition of lyric poetry.

303 Advanced Latin Prose Composition (3) Required of Latin majors; open to other students accepted by the instructor. The complex syntactical structures of Latin of classical style. Translations of English into classical Latin.

304 The Latin Elegiac Poets (3) Latin elegiac poetry through readings in Ovid, Tibullus, Lygdamus, Sulpicia, and Propertius. Practice in the composition of elegiac poetry.

305 Reading Course in Latin (3) Open to Latin majors only. Area and content to be determined by the student's needs.
This course may be taken again for credit.

306 Roman Historians (3) Introduction to Roman historiography. Readings in Livy, Sallust, and Tacitus.

401 Roman Drama (3) Origins and development of Roman drama. Selected plays of Plautus, Terence, and Seneca.

402 Roman Philosophy (3) Introduction to Greek and Roman philosophy. Readings in Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, and Lucretius, De Rerum Natura.

403 Roman Satire (3) Origins and development of Roman satire. Readings in Horace, Persius, and Juvenal.

404 The Latin Novel (3) Readings in Petronius, Satyricon, and Apuleius, The Golden Ass. Lectures and discussions of the emergence of the novel as a literary form.

405 Medieval Latin (3) Prose and poetry from the fourth to the 17th centuries.

406 Latin Tutorial Course (3) Required of majors in Latin or Classics; open to other students accepted by the instructor. Introduction to the history of the alphabet; principles of historical and comparative linguistics, especially as applied to Greek and Latin; and history of the Latin language as seen in ancient authors and inscriptions.

410 Independent Studies in Latin Language and Literature (3) Special topics for advanced students only. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

411 Seminar in Latin (3) Independent study and research for upper-division students. Topics announced annually by the Latin faculty. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

412 Seminar in Latin (3) Independent study and research for upper-division students. Topics announced annually by the Latin faculty. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

PORTUGUESE
Symbol: POR

101-102 Elementary Portuguese I-II (3) (3) Fundamentals of Portuguese grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Introduction to Brazilian heritage and culture through graded reading selections.

201-202 Intermediate Portuguese I-II (3) (3) Review and continuation of basic Portuguese with emphasis on vocabulary expansion and cultural insights through increased reading. Introduction to selected Portuguese and Brazilian authors. PREREQ: POR 102.

RUSSIAN
Symbol: RUS

101-102 Elementary Russian I-II (3) (3) Fundamentals of Russian language. Intensive practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing to develop basic communication skills. Introduction to Russian culture through film and multimedia. No previous knowledge of Russian is required.

103 Intensive Elementary Russian I-II (6) Fundamentals of Russian language. Intensive practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing to develop basic communication skills. This accelerated course meets five days per week and completes the 101-102 elementary sequence in a single semester. Introduction to Russian culture through film and multimedia. No previous knowledge of Russian is required.

201-202 Intermediate Russian I-II (3) (3) Review and refinement of communicative skills through continuing study of grammatical structures and vocabulary expansion. Composition and conversation based on writings of intermediate difficulty and film sources. Continuing study of Russian culture through film and multimedia. PREREQ: RUS 102 or 103.

203 Intensive Intermediate Russian I-II (6) Reinforcement and refinement of communicative skills through the continuing study and review of grammatical structures. Continuing study of Russian culture and life through film and multimedia. Course meets five days per week and completes the 201-202 sequence in a single semester. PREREQ: RUS 101-102 or 103.

NOTE: All advanced literature and civilization courses include lectures and discussion in the foreign language, and all student papers and examinations must be written in the foreign language.

301-302 Advanced Russian Grammar and Composition I-II (3) (3) The more complex grammatical and syntactical structures of the language, with particular attention to stylistics. Practice in writing compositions on a more advanced level, with emphasis on current usage. Russian culture through readings in the original. PREREQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent.

303-304 Advanced Readings in Russian Literature I-II (3) (3) Works of Russian literature are read and analyzed. Russian culture through readings in the original. PREREQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent.

305 Russian Civilization I (3) Russian literature in the original is read and analyzed. Russian culture through authentic readings. PREREQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent.

401 The Russian Novel (3) The Russian novel and literary trends of the 19th and 20th centuries. PREREQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent.

402 The Russian Drama (3) Works of the major dramatists of the 19th and 20th centuries. PREREQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent.

403 Russian Poetry of the 20th Century (3) A study of the principal Russian poets of the 20th century. Use of poetry reading to refine pronunciation. PREREQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent.

407-408 Advanced Oral Russian I-II (3) (3) Active work in the oral use of the language and phonetics to develop proficiency in listening comprehension and speaking in real-life situations. Work with contemporary Russian film and music resources. PREREQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent.

410 Independent Studies in Russian Language and Literature (3) Special topics for advanced students only. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

411 Seminar in Russian (3) Independent study and research for upper-division students. Topics announced annually by the Russian faculty. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

412 Seminar in Russian (3) Independent study and research for upper-division students. Topics announced annually by the Russian faculty. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

Offerings in English (ERU): Interdisciplinary and Culture-Cluster Courses

ERU 309 Russian Culture (3) (In English) An interdisciplinary course designed to acquaint students with Russian culture and life in Russia today. No knowledge of Russian required.
Culture cluster
Approved interdisciplinary course. Writing emphasis course.

ERU 310 The Literature of Russia (3) Survey of Russian culture from a literary and cinematographic perspective. No knowledge of the Russian language is required.
Culture cluster

ERU 363 Russian and Soviet Film and Literature (3) A comparative approach to selected 20th century Soviet works of fiction, poetry, drama, and film.

SPANISH

Symbol: SPA

101-102 Elementary Spanish I-II (3) (3) Fundamentals of Spanish geared to facilitate the development of functional proficiency at the novice levels in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Introduction to Spanish and Latin American culture through readings and discussion.

103 Intensive Elementary Spanish (6) Fundamentals of Spanish grammar, syntax, pronunciation, and communication skills. This is an accelerated course that meets five days per week and covers the equivalent of SPA 101-102 in a single semester. No prerequisite.

118 Spanish for Professional Development (3) Lower-level topics course with the content varying in response to the instructional focus, which ranges from “Doing Business in Latin America” to “Spanish for Hospital Nurses,” among other topics. The specific instruction covered in the course is designed to address and meet the language and cultural needs and provide continuing education venues for area professionals.

201-202 Intermediate Spanish I-II (3) (3) Spanish with an emphasis on proficiency development at the intermediate level. Elements of grammar and pronunciation are introduced in class and via laboratory work. Literary and journalistic readings are utilized as a basis for writing assignments and class discussions in Spanish. PREREQ: SPA 102 or placement.

NOTE: All advanced courses above 202 include lectures and discussion in the language, and all student papers and examinations must be written in the language.

205 Intensive Intermediate Spanish (6) Reinforcement of communication skills through practice and review of grammatical structures. Composition and conversation, reading from a variety of genres. This is an accelerated course that meets five times per week and covers the equivalent of SPA 201-202 in a single semester. PREREQ: SPA 102 or 103 or placement.

250 Intensive Intermediate Spanish/Peru (3) An intermediate-level Spanish course thematically tied to ecological issues and given in conjunction with the Amazon Center for Environmental Education and Research (ACEER) summer trip to Peru.

301-302 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Conversation I-II (3) (3) Review and mastery of Spanish grammar, with special emphasis on syntactic structures and stylistics, along with intensive interaction to develop proficiency in listening comprehension and speaking ability. PREREQ: SPA 202 or placement.

304 Spanish Language Topics in the Community (3) Spanish for the professional in fields such as social work, immigration, criminal justice, law, and medicine. Emphasis on oral communication in specific, real-life situations. Some interpretation, translation, and writing or professional documents. PREREQ: SPA 301-302 or permission of instructor.

310 Business Topics in Spanish (3) Introduction to basic business concepts in Spanish in fields of management, banking, finance, accounting, marketing, and international business. No prior knowledge of business required. Practical course in oral communication. Some interpretation, translation, and writing of business documents. PREREQ: SPA 301-302 or permission of instructor. Writing emphasis course.

313 Latin America on Film (3) The course screens several films about Latin America that address critical issues (history, politics, economy, religion, ethnic diversity, racial and gender discrimination) necessary to understand and appreciate Latin America culture. PREREQ: SPA 301-302 or permission of instructor.

315 Advanced Readings in Spanish (3) Introductory readings of Spanish and Spanish-American works from a variety of sources, including literary texts. Special attention to improvement of grammar, and oral and written expression. PREREQ: SPA 301-302 or permission of instructor.

320 Cultures of Spain (3) Major contributions of Spain. Cultural, geographic, literary, philosophical, and artistic manifestations of the Hispanic world. PREREQ: SPA 301-302 or permission of instructor.

321 Cultures of Spanish America (3) Cultural, geographic, literary, philosophical, and artistic manifestations of the Hispanic-American world. PREREQ: SPA 315 or permission of instructor.

323 Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean (3) (In Spanish) A study of the language and cultures of the Caribbean. Includes geography, history, immigration, and emigration. Emphasis on Spanish language patterns, literature, and cultural history. PREREQ: SPA 301-302 or permission of instructor.

330 Survey of Spanish Literature (3) Representative selections of Spanish literature from its medieval beginning to the present. Focus will be on a variety of genres that highlight the interplay of language and context to understand dominant themes and concerns of a global era. PREREQ: SPA 315 or permission of instructor.

331 Spanish-American Narrative (3) Representative selections of Spanish-American literature from 1492 to the present. Focus will be on the interplay of culture, society, colonial, and post-colonial politics on Spanish-American literary expression. PREREQ: SPA 315 or permission of instructor.

340 Study of Bilingualism: An Introduction (3) The course focuses on the bilingual situation in the U.S., Latin America, and Spain. Topics include the linguistic development of bilingual speakers, linguistic aspects such as the case of pidgin and creole languages, the definition of “Spanglish,” and sociopolitical aspects such as linguistic loyalty, linguistic politics and planning, and attitudes toward the bilingualism. Taught in Spanish.

353 Introduction to the Study of Language: Spanish (3) A study of different aspects of languages, the structure of their sounds, how words are organized, their meanings, how languages are acquired, and how they are used in society. This course is conducted entirely in Spanish, although examples from other languages and their speakers will also be addressed.

365 Spanish Phonetics (3) Description and practice in the sounds of the Spanish language and its major dialectical differences. Comparative analysis with English. PREREQ: LIN 230 or LAN 327 and SPA 302.

370 History of the Spanish Language (3) Introduction to the history of the Spanish language to study its evolution and fundamental basics of research in the history of a language using primary sources to understand the mechanics involved in language change and the social and cultural evolution of the communities that use the language.

375 Spanish for Heritage Speakers (3) This course is for students who learned Spanish in a nonacademic setting. The goal is to develop, challenge, and broaden the command of the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) to make students aware of cultural differences in the Spanish-speaking world. Upon successful completion, students will have enhanced their receptive (listening and reading) and productive (writing and speaking) performance.

400 Spanish Literature to 1550 (3) Spanish literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, including epic, early lyric, prose, and theater. PREREQ: SPA 330 or permission of instructor.

401 Spanish Literature of the Golden Age (3) Spanish literature of the 16th and 17th centuries: mysticism, drama, poetry, and the novel. PREREQ: SPA 330 or permission of instructor.

402 Spanish Drama of the Golden Age (3) Themes and traditions of the comedia. PREREQ: SPA 330 or permission of instructor.

404 Cervantes (3) Study of Don Quixote and Cervantes' contributions to world literature. PREREQ: SPA 330 or permission of instructor.

405 Modern Hispanic Literature (18th and 19th Centuries) (3) Spanish and Spanish-American thought, literature, and culture as revealed in outstanding works from the neo-Classical period to the end of the 19th century. PREREQ: SPA 330 or 331 or permission of instructor.

406 Modern Spanish Literature (3) A reading and evaluation of the literary and philosophical contributions of writers such as Unamuno, Baroja, Benavente, and Valle-Inclán. PREREQ: SPA 330 or permission of instructor.

407 Contemporary Literature of Spain (3) Introduction to works that represent Spanish literature from the Civil War period to the present. Authors studied include Arrabal, Cela, Delibes, García Lorca, Goytisolo, Matute, Sender, and others. PREREQ: SPA 330 or permission of instructor.

408 Modern Hispanic Poetry (3) A survey of major authors and movements in Spanish and Spanish-American poetry of the 19th and 20th centuries. Authors include Vicente Aleixandre, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Rubén Darío, José Espronceda, Federico García Lorca, Gabriela Mistral, and Pablo Neruda. Movements include Romanticism, Modernism, and the avant-garde. PREREQ: SPA 330 or 331 or permission of instructor.

410 Contemporary Spanish-American Prose Fiction (3) A focus on 20th-century prose fiction in Spanish America. The works of narratists such as Borges, Carpentier, Cortázar, Fuentes, and García Márquez will be examined closely, in light of Spanish-American cultural and literary modalities. PREREQ: SPA 331 or permission of instructor.

411 Hispanic Theater (3) A study of the theater as a reflection of social realities including the theater of the absurd; the dynamic of play and audience. The Spanish-American stage will be analyzed through its cultural, historical, and religious contexts. PREREQ: SPA 331 or permission of instructor.

412 Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean (3) An analysis of the literature of the Hispanic Caribbean, placing it in its historical, geographical, and cultural context through a survey of major authors and movements. PREREQ: SPA 331 or permission of instructor.

413 Hispanic Women Writers (3) An examination of the tradition of women writers and their works in Spain and Spanish America from the 17th century to the present. Includes fiction, poetry, and theater. PREREQ: SPA 330 or 331 or permission of instructor.

415 Cinema of Spain (3) Fictionalized perspectives of 20th and 21st century social realities since the Spanish Civil War. Discussion topics include social criticism, the psychology of adolescence, immigration, and historical memory. PREREQ: SPA 330 or 331 or permission of instructor.

444 Advanced Spanish Proficiency Development (3) This course provides intensive practice of advanced communications skills in speaking, listening, comprehension, writing, and reading, along with a review of Spanish grammar to foster proficiency development. Acquisition of cultural knowledge through a study of cultural products, perspectives, and practice. Course includes a language lab component. PREREQ: SPA 330 and 331, or permission of instructor.

456-457 Hispanic Literature, Language, and Culture Seminar I-II (3) (3) Special topics for advanced students only, such as politics and literature in contemporary Latin America, the literature of discovery and conquest, the novel of the dictator, and Spanish literature during and after Franco. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.
This course may be taken again for credit.

472 Nobel Laureates in Hispanic Letters (3) A course devoted to studying those Spanish-language writers from Spain and Spanish America who won the Nobel Prize in Literature during the 20th and 21st century for their literary achievements; to analyze their works and the sociopolitical context of their writings; and to examine the politics of literary awards and the significance of their recognition. PREREQ: SPA 330 or 331.

Offerings in English (ESP): Interdisciplinary and Culture-Cluster Courses

ESP 300 Latin American Culture and Civilization (3) Cultural, geographic, literary, philosophical, and artistic manifestations of the Hispanic-American world. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Culture cluster
Approved interdisciplinary course. Writing emphasis course.

ESP 305 Spanish Cinema: Nation and Gender (3) This course will investigate the ways in which films participate in and create debates about the relationship between national identification and gender. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Culture cluster

ESP 306 Representations of the Spanish Civil War (3) A study off how political activism in Spain created debates about the relationship between national culture(s), society, politics, and "official" versions of history.
Culture cluster

ESP 307 Spanish Women (1931 to present) (3) An examination of contributions of Spanish women to cultural movements that have shaped Spain’s national identity and history. Selections from novels, short stories, poems, and films. Culture cluster

ESP 309 Latin America on Film (in English) (3) This course screens several films about Latin America, and it addresses critical issues (history, political, economic, religion, ethnic diversity, and gender and class discrimination) necessary to understand Latin American culture.
Culture cluster

ESP/CLS 311 Contemporary Latin American Narrative (3) An examination of Latin American narrative (short story, novella, novel, and testimonial literature). Spanish- and Portuguese-language writers from South and Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean will be studied, from the period of magical realism (1950's and 1960's) through the present. They may include Isabel Allende, Jorge Amado, Miguel Angel Asturias, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriel García Márquez, Clarice Lispector, Elena Poniatowska, and Luis Rafael Sánchez. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Culture cluster

ESP 318 Speaking Spanish in the United States (3) A course on the different historical, social, and cultural issues related to the use of Spanish in the United States alongside other languages, mainly English, including the centuries-long presence of the language, and phenomena such as bilingualism, code-switching, language shift, and language death. This course is taught entirely in English.

ESP 319 Cultural Realities of Spain (3) A study of the origins and evolution of Spanish character, tradition, and thought as a result of its multicultural past and present. The interrelationship of its history and arts. The scope of its contribution to Western culture. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Culture cluster
Approved interdisciplinary course.

ESP 324 Latinos in the U.S. (3) An interdisciplinary examination of Latinas/Latinos in the U.S. Course examines the changing cultural, historical, political, and economic situations of several Hispanic groups, including Central Americans, Cubans, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans.
Culture cluster
Approved interdisciplinary course

ESP 333 Latina Writing (3) An examination of the literary works produced by Latinas in the 20th century. The study of this literature will include a cross-cultural approach that will elucidate sociopolitical themes emerging from the texts. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Culture cluster
Diverse communities course

ESP/CLS 334 Politics and Economics in the Literatures of the Modern Americas (3) A comparative historical and literary examination of political and economic issues reflected in 20th century U.S. and Latin American literature. The study of representative texts of various genres will also elucidate issues of race, class, and gender. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Culture cluster

ESP/CLS 335 Latino Literatures in the U.S. (3) This course examines the history of Latino groups (e.g., Mexicans, Cubans, and South Americans) in the U.S. through literary texts written by Latinos, and studies the cultural, economic, and political experiences leading to their acculturation or alientation in mainstream America.
Culture cluster
Diverse communities course

ESP 362 New World: America (3) The impact the discovery, conquest, and colonization of the New World had on Europe is seen through diverse sources in literature, history, the arts, and related disciplines. Topics include the trans-Atlantic exchange of ideas and cultures, indigenous religions, ethic of conquest, evangelization, cartography, colonial science, changing views of humanity, and nature. Course includes a field trip and guest lecturers. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Approved interdisciplinary course

ESP 403 Introduction to Cervantes and Don Quixote (3) Reading the full text of Don Quixote. Important chapters and topics will be analyzed. Special emphasis given to problems of translation. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Culture cluster

COURSES COMMON TO ALL LANGUAGES

LAN 305 Introduction to Bilingual/Bicultural Education (3) Introduction to the history, philosophy, current status, and future directions of bilingual/bicultural education. Survey of materials, techniques, instructional processes, and instructional patterns. Overview of testing, placement, and pupil evaluation. PREREQ: Intermediate level proficiency in a second language and LIN 250 or equivalent.

LAN 327 Introduction to Linguistics for Language Majors (3) An introduction to applied linguistics structured to meet the needs of language majors and future world language teachers. Examples are drawn from the language(s) expertise of the students.

LAN 382 Teaching English Language Learners (ELL’s) PK-12 (3) A study of issues and the application of techniques, strategies, and materials for meeting the needs of English Language Learners (ELL’s) in inclusive classrooms. Emphases include sociocultural issues in education contexts, TESOL through the content area, linguistics, second language acquisition, the integration and application of the PA English Language Proficiency Standards PK-12 (ELPS), and current trends in second language teaching, learning, and assessment. Includes a field component. Crosslisted as ENG 382.

LAN 401 Teaching of Modern Languages: K-12 (3) Problems, methods, and materials of second language acquisition and teaching across levels. Observation and participation in K-12 classrooms. PREREQ: Completion of language courses through the advanced level and LIN 230.

LAN 403 Second Languages in the Elementary School (3) Techniques and materials used in teaching second languages in the elementary school. Practice in the application of these techniques and observation of language classes. PREREQ: Completion of the minor in the chosen language.

LAN 411 Topical Seminar (3) Specialized studies in language and the teaching of languages.
This course may be taken again for credit.

LAN 425 Internship in Modern Languages (3-12) A structured and supervised experience for students wishing to enhance their language study directly in the workplace. Credits earned are based on time spent on the job. For approval, students must apply to the department chair or language section coordinator.

LIN 211 Language Communities in the United States and Canada (3) Exploration and analysis of how aspects of language usage (dialect, "accent," bilingualism) relate to language-based discrimination in the U.S. and Canada generally. Emphasis is on bias, discrimination, and profiling based on race, class, gender, religious affiliation, and ethnicity. Examples will be drawn from mainstream media, including popular film and television.
Diverse communities course

LIN 230 (also ENG 230) Introduction to Linguistics (3) See ENG 230.

LIN 250 Psycholinguistics (3) Introduction to the study of relationships between language, generative models, communication theory, and learning theory. Major emphasis on natural language development and bilingualism.

LIN 380 Language and Culture (3) Language as an aspect of culture, using linguistic-perceptual-cognitive categories; social and psychological aspects of language. PREREQ: LAN 327 or LIN 230 , or permission of instructor.

LIN 411-412 Seminar in Linguistics (3) (3) Specialized studies in linguistics. Topics announced annually. PREREQ: LAN 237 OR LIN 230, or at least junior standing.
This course may be taken again for credit.

LIN 415 (also COM 415) General Semantics (3) See COM 415.