Presentation Schedule

KCB Agenda at a Glance (PDF)
  Technology Sustainability Best Practices in Higher Education Globalization and Transnationalization in Higher Education Funding Models for Higher Education Other
Session 1 (Wednesday, 10:30 – 11:45 AM) Full Session
1.1.1. The Higher Ed Classroom in the Post-PC Era

MER 112
David L. Bolton,
Christian Penny
Individual
1.2.1. Public Health Issues
UNA 162
Marcela Gutiérrez
Gopal Sankaran
Doris Fernández


Full Session
1.2.2. Experiencing the Power of the Campus Garden: Sustainability Lessons for Life
MER113
Joy Fritschle
Paul Morgan
Joan Welch
Individual
1.3.1. Support Services in Higher Education 1
REC 301
Gerardina L. Martin
Courtney A. Lloyd
Marty Patwell
Kathleen Ellis
Andrea Todd


Full Sessions
1.3.3. Promoting Second Language Learning through Service-Learning: University Students and English Language Learners Together in the Classroom
AND 120
Andrea VarricchioAngela Della Valle
Cathryn Crosby
Individual
1.4.1. Helping Students Gain Access to Higher Education
BRN 04
Oscar Avila
Ludmilla Aufurth
J. Knoben
H. Raab
B. Kaashoek
Kussai Haj Yehia


1.4.2. Teaching  Global Higher Education 1
BRN 31
Anita Foeman
Stephanie Laggini Fiore


Full Session
1.4.3. Teaching Asia: Prospects and Challenges
AND 111
Cecilia Chien
Valerian DeSousa
Lawrence Davidson
   
Session 2 (Wednesday: 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM) Individual
2.1.1. Strengthening Science Education
MER 112
Lilliana Piedra
Geovanni Jiménez


2.1.2. Using Technology to Connect
BRN 04
Courtney L. McLaughlin
Jonathan R. Brown
Juan Carlos Sandí Delgado
Individual
2.2.1. Women’s Issues in International Education 1
MER 113
Eva Samqui
Juliana Francis
William B. Lalicker

Individual
2.3.1. Model Teaching Programs
AND 120
Sandy Portorreal
Cesarina Bencosme
María del Carmen Acuña
Roibito Ekpiken-Ekanem
David Otu Effiom


Full Sessions
2.3.2 Distance Education – We All Have Stories AND 103
Patricia Beneš
Connie L. DiLucchio
Michelle Fisher
Rui Li
Christian Penny


Individual
2.4.1. Effect of Globalization upon Higher Education 1
AND 111
Cheer-Sun Yang
Hsiou-Hsia Tai
Full Session
2.5.1. Best Practices in Winning External Grants
UNA 162
Michael Ehi Ayewoh
Session 3 (Wednesday: 3:00 PM – 4:15 PM) Individual
3.1.1. Teaching Using Distance Education
MER 112
John H. Hanson
Darrell Norman Burrell
Andrea Todd
Maria A. (Ola) Kopacz
Philip A. Thompsen

Individual
3.2.1. Women’s Issues in International Education 2
MER 113
Noorullah Elham
Kalyani Akalamkam
Juliana Francis


Full Session
3.2.2 Validity in Studies on Health Science: The Role of Statistics
UNA 162
Juan José Romero Zúñiga
Individual
3.3.1. Support Services in Higher Education 2
AND 120
Lenna Barrantes
Cinthya Olivares
Stephen Martin


3.3.2 Teaching Physical Education
REC 301
Sandy Portorreal
Atlas Osiris Sosa
Rudy López
Cesarina Bencosme


Full Session
3.3.3. Educator Externship panel discussion
AND 103
Christian Penny
Robert Corry
Laura Heikkila
Christine DiPaulo
Lanny Schwartz
Individual
3.4.1. Writing, Literature, and the Theater
AND 111
Carolina Ramírez Guerrero
Paula Rojas


Individual
3.5.1. Advocacy and Funding for Higher Education
BRN 04
Jorska Gómez
Francis Atuahene
Poster Sessions
Sykes 209
Claire L. Dente
Vickie Ann McCoy
Eric Owens
Karen Dickinson
Jennifer Walker
Alannah Crooms
Erin Hipple
Lauri Hyers
Loretta Parks
Charles V. Shorten
Robert Donofrio
M. Sc. Edgar A. Vega Briceño
Courtney L. McLaughlin
Crystal Machado
Hayat Messekher
Session 4 (Thursday: 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM) Full Session
4.1.1. Bring Your Own Device “BYOD”, Providing IT as a Service
MER 112
Lee Gitzes

4.1.2. Software Solutions to Support Strategic Planning
AND 120
David Raney
Individual
4.2.1. Promoting Sustainability
MER 113
Lilliana Piedra
Ana María González Quirós
Ana Isabel Miranda Villalta
Grettel María Víquez Miranda
Nuestra Señora de Lourde


4.2.2. Gender Issues
UNA 162
Ane Turner Johnson
Individual
4.3.1. Using Reflection as Teaching and Assessment
AND 103
Rick Voss
David L. Bolton


4.3.2. Knowledge Management 1
REC 301
Majid Bayani
Gisselle Herrera
Aracelly Ugalde
Lucía Chacón

Individual
4.4.1 The Effect of Globalization upon Higher Education 2
AND 111
H. S. Tripathi
Francis Atuahene
   
Session 5 (Thursday: 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM) Full Session
5.1.1. Using Technology to Bridge Boundaries: Potentials of a Geographic Information System (GIS)
MER 112
Gary Coutu
Kristen Crossney
Dorothy Ives-Dewey
Matin Katirai
Esteban Romero
Individual
5.2.1. Social Issues in Hispanic Cultures
UNA 162
Karol Monge
Marcela Gutiérrez
Florybeth Sanchez
Ana Sanchez
Joseph Pierre


Full Session
5.2.2. Higher Education for Sustainability: Challenges & Strategies
MER 113
Paul Morgan
Individual
5.3.1. Increasing Math Achievement
AND 120
Yasemin Derelioğlu
Dilek Çağırgan Gülten
İlker Soytürk
José Andrey Zamora


5.3.2. Study Abroad Programs
BRN 31
T.H. Baughman
Deirdre Pettipiece


Full Sessions
5.3.3. Service Learning in Higher Education
AND 103
Hannah Ashley
Eleanor Brown
Linda Stevenson


5.3.4. Mindfulness and self-compassion in health care education.
REC 301
Donald McCown
Christine Williams
Christine Moriconi
Individual
5.4.1. Teaching Global Higher Education 2
AND 111
Darrell Norman Burrell
Andrea Todd
Franklyn A. Manu
Leyland M. Lucas
Stephen O. Agyei-Mensah


5.4.2 Public Higher Education in Costa Rica 1
BRN 04
Orlando de la O and Víctor Baltodano
Leiner Vargas
   
Session 6 (Thursday: 3:00 PM – 4:15 PM) Individual
6.1.1. Using Technologies to Teach
MER 112
Jacqueline Araya
Beatriz Gamboa
Roopak Chauhan
Individual
6.2.1. Teaching Sustainability in Higher Education
MER 113
Greg Turner
Individual
6.3.1. Relationships between Higher Education and Community
AND 120
Yalile Jiménez
Cinthya Olivares
Sandra Palacios
Yendry Dover
Marcela Gutiérrez


6.3.2. Public Service
REC 301
Tadeusz Truskolaski


Full Session
6.3.3. Teaching and Learning in a Global World
AND 103
Marilyn Dono-Koulouris
Individual
6.4.1. Promoting Access to Quality Pedagogy
BRN 04
Deyanira Castellón R.
Carlos Clavijo Arboleda

Full Session
6.4.2. Schooling the World: The White Man’s Last Burden
AND 111
David L. Bolton
   
Session 7 (Friday: 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM) Full Session
7.1.1. Classrooms with broad horizons and without walls
MER 112
Padmini Murthy
Individual
7.2.1. Teaching Sustainability: Rivers and River Basins
MER 113
Gary Coutu
Kalyani Akalamkam


7.2.2. Addressing Economic Disparities
UNA 162
Muhammad Mukhtar
Zahida Parveen
Felix Kayode Olakulehin
Individual
7.3.1. Knowledge Management 2
AND 120
Jacqueline M. Zalewski
Leigh S. Shaffer


Full Session
7.3.2. Workshop: Social Action Approach in Higher Education
AND 103
Alison Dobrick
Individual
7.4.1. Public Higher Education in Costa Rica 2
AND 111
Sandra Palacios
Yalile Jiménez Olivares
Víctor Julio Baltodano
Orlando de la O
   

Session 1 (Wednesday: 10:30 AM – 11:45 PM)

 

Theme: Technology

 Full Session

1.1.1 The Higher Ed Classroom in the Post-PC Era
Location: Merion 112

Presenters
David L. Bolton, PhD; Christian Penny, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract

Ready or not, we are entering the Post-PC era. A time when mobile technology, such as the Apple iPad, will change how we teach and how we learn in the Higher Education classroom. This presentation will bring together the research, and the stories, from one-to-one initiatives from around the country.

Biographies

Dr. David L. Bolton received his PhD in research and testing from Florida State University and his MS in research and statistical methodology from Andrews University. Dr. Bolton's primary area of research is assessing attitudes toward and use of educational technology in education.

Dr. Christian Penny works at West Chester University as an associate professor of educational technology. He is a graduate of Penn State University with a PhD in curriculum and instruction. In 2007 he became an Apple Distinguished Educator and in 2009 a Google Certified Teacher. His primary research interest is technology integration in Pre-K-12 and also in higher education.

Theme: Sustainability

Individual Presentations

1.2.1. Public Health Issues
Location: 25 University Avenue 162

Title
The public university as a promoter of health: the case of the Intergenerational Learning Project for breast cancer awareness in women over 15 years of age in the metropolitan area

Presenter
Marcela Gutiérrez – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

The project's aim is to develop an intergenerational educational program to raise awareness of breast cancer for women over the age of 15 as a contribution to health and family welfare. This project has identified a number of social actors in order to involve them in planning and implementation. Among the various agreements reached are those with Proyecto Pacientes, La Asociación Resurgir (Alajuela), La Asociación Pro Paciente Oncológico, Cuidados Paliativos, and Alivio del Dolor del Hospital de la Mujer. Such agreements focus on finding a better quality of life for women with breast disease, on training women in self-examination, and on promoting early diagnosis.

Biography

Marcela Gutiérrez, a surgeon from the Universidad Iberoamericana, Costa Rica, has experience in the fields of public health, health and the environment, and health in at-risk populations. She was a consultant to the International Center for Economic Policy at the Universidad Nacional (UNA). Her work has focused on methodologies and practical exercises for decision-making in the field of public health and the development and implementation of UNA programs to promote health and improve the quality of life for students and seniors. Currently she is on the faculty of UNA's Center for General Studies and is the coordinator of the projects "Comprehensive Training for Young People" and "Intergenerational Education for the Prevention of Breast and Cervical Cancer in Women in the Greater Metropolitan Area," which are funded by the National Council of Rectors.


Title
Realizing global prevention and control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection: role of higher education

Presenter
Gopal Sankaran, MD, DrPH – West Chester University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

In 2010, an estimated 2.7 million new HIV infections occurred worldwide and 1.8 million people died from AIDS-related causes. Access to antiretroviral treatment had reached 47 percent in low- and middle-income nations. The majority of people living in these nations, in particular, did not know their HIV serostatus. This paper discusses the progress made, the feasibility of achieving the two targets related to HIV/AIDS in MDG-6, lessons learned, and recommendations for immediate future. It highlights the role of higher education in realizing MDG-6 with an emphasis on advancing human rights and gender equality for all.

Biography

Dr. Gopal Sankaran is a professor of public health at West Chester University, USA. His education, training and experience span three interrelated health professions—medicine, public health, and health promotion. As an epidemiologist, he worked with WHO in the National Smallpox Eradication Programme and the Global Programme on AIDS.


Title
Health and recreation in poor Costa Rican families

Presenter
Doris Fernández – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract

This paper, an analysis of the survival strategies of poor households from a gender perspective, is the result of qualitative research that is currently being conducted by the Women's Studies Institute at the National University in Costa Rica. By the end of 2011, data had been collected in three urban-marginal communities in the province of Heredia, in Costa Rica. This work examines some of the socio-demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the sampled households. The examination is designed to enable accurate identification of the actual conditions in which these people live and the coping strategies and social practices integral to their lives. This paper particularly addresses health and recreation, two vital dimensions of social life.

Biography

Doris Fernández is a faculty member in the Women's Studies Institute at Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. She is a professor in the Development Management with Gender Equity baccalaureate program and teaches the course Gender, Poverty, and Sustainable Human Development. Professor Fernández is a sociologist with a master's degree in women's studies. In 2011, she published the book Sexualidad y género en condiciones de pobreza (Sexuality and Gender in Poverty).

Full Session

1.2.2. Experiencing the Power of the Campus Garden: Sustainability Lessons for Life
Location: Merion 113

Presenters
Joy Fritschle, Paul Morgan and Joan Welch, West Cheter University

Abstract

The workshop provides a history of the development of a campus garden and offers the experiences of faculty members who used the garden as a learning tool. The presentation of student outcomes from experiential learning includes changes in food procurement and eating habits, increased knowledge of critical sustainability issues such as soil health and organic food production, and active engagement in gardening. Presenters will share resource materials for developing a campus garden. Participants will visit the campus garden to learn about how to construct raised beds, use trellises to increase growing spaces, and design companion planting for integrated pest management.

Biographies

Dr. Paul Morgan is an associate professor of professional and secondary education at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. He is the director of undergraduate and graduate certificate programs in education for sustainability and has been appointed the University's sustainability coordinator for 2011-2012. He is currently pursuing research in education for worldview change.

Dr. Joy Fritschle is an assistant professor of geography and planning at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She conducts research involving ecological restoration of forests and woodlands, carbon and cost-benefit assessments of urban forests, and sustainable development through agriculture and forestry. She teaches courses in environmental geography and sustainable living.
Dr. Joan Welch is a Professor of Geography and Planning at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She teaches Environmental Conservation and Sustainability, Science Technology and Environmental Systems, along with introductory physical and world geography courses. She conducts research on the role of wild ungulates in landscape processes in southeastern Pennsylvania and the Pyrenees of Catalunya, northeastern Spain.

 

Theme: Best Practices in Higher Education

Individual Sessions

1.3.1. Support Services in Higher Education
Location: Recitation 301

Title
Best tutoring practices in higher education

Presenters
Gerardina L. Martin, Courtney A. Lloyd – West Chester University

Abstract

West Chester University's Learning Assistance and Resource Center (LARC) strives to provide quality academic support to help students become independent, active learners who achieve academic success. LARC staff work diligently to provide tutors with quality and effective training through the College Reading and Learning Association. In addition, face-to-face tutoring is supplemented with an online tutoring service to provide flexible academic support for commuters, athletes, and students who cannot take advantage of the traditional methods of tutoring. Other services include an Academic Success Workshop, Praxis Reviews, and Supplemental Instruction for high-risk courses. The presentation will highlight best practices of tutoring in higher education.

Biographies

Gerardina L. Martin, interim director of the Learning Assistance and Resource Center, has an MM in piano pedagogy, an MA in English, and an MEd in higher education and is working on her JD. She has Level III Master Tutor Certification from the College Reading and Learning Association.

Courtney A. Lloyd, interim assistant director of the Learning Assistance and Resource Center, began as a supplemental instruction coordinator. She graduated with a BS in criminal justice from the Pennsylvania State University in 2006 and graduated from West Chester University with an MPA in 2010.


Title
Disability Studies infusion Project

Presenter
Marty Patwell, EdD; Kathleen Ellis, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract

Four key goals guided our demonstration project "Disability Studies Infusion" to ensure students with disabilities receive a quality post-secondary-education experience: 1) The West Chester University (WCU) Office of Services for Students with Disabilities (OSSD) will present disability as part of diversity training when orienting all new faculty and staff. 2) Faculty teaching several diversity courses will include disability-studies-based content demonstrating that disability is part of the larger concept of diversity as well as a critical analytical mooring for studying intellectual history. 3) Faculty and staff at WCU will make available an array of accessibility formats employing principles of universal design for learning as part of their pedagogy in order to facilitate the educational opportunities of all students—including diverse learners with disabilities. 4) There will be increased national recognition of the ways in which accessibility and universal design for learning, including the provision of assistive technology and the infusion of disability-studies-based curriculum, can reduce attrition among students with disabilities, who often critique their education as being irrelevant to their experiences as a member of what some call "the country's largest minority group." Approximately 1,000 students from various diversity courses participated in a short survey to gauge attitudes toward disability on the WCU campus. The survey was administered in the first week of the fall 2011 and spring 2012 semesters and again during the last two weeks of those semesters. Students were asked to fill out anonymous surveys and instruments pre-and post-attendance in the disabilities-studies-infused courses to rate attitudes towards diverse populations. Average change scores for closed-response questions on the written in-class questionnaire were used to assess the effectiveness of the infusion.

Biographies

Dr. Kat Ellis is an associate professor of kinesiology at West Chester University specializing in disability studies, deaf culture, and adapted physical education. Dr. Ellis received a dual PhD from Michigan State University in kinesiology and deaf education and was previously a faculty member at the University of Rhode Island.
Dr. Marty Patwell, EdD, is a professor at WCU and is a member of the Educational Development Department and the director of Services for Students with Disabilities. He has a strong research and pedagogical interest in disability studies as a method and context for serious study. He has written numerous grants and presented nationally and internationally, including at the 2010 CIESUP conference in Heredia, Costa Rica, as well as in Macau, Shanghai, Guizhou, and Jiangxi, China. In 2010 Dr. Patwell researched disability-studies programs and practices in southern Europe in preparation for a book on disability consciousness.


Title
How an intensive English program and a graduate counseling program founded a strong working relationship

Presenter
Andrea Todd, EdD – Virginia Tech

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

It is the exception rather than the rule for two distinctly asymmetrical programs to explore common ground for collaboration that enhances each other's mission. The Virginia Tech Language and Culture Institute (VTLCI) and the Counselor Education Program (CEP), both located at Virginia Tech's Northern Virginia Center, have begun a partnership that enhances the educational experiences of international students enrolled in pre-academic English language training and graduate students enrolled in master's and doctoral degree programs in counselor education. The partnership began when the associate director of the VTLCI sought assistance with issues of "culture shock" affecting the international students studying English. Anxiety resulting from the loss of "familiar signs and symbols of social intercourse" (Oberg, 1954, p. 1) was causing various degrees of distress, and the director of the CEP wholeheartedly agreed to provide support through presentations to the student body. Subsequently, the director of the CEP asked for volunteers among the VTLCI student body to be interviewed by graduate students enrolled in a multiculturalism course. This face-to-face interaction served to enrich the graduate students' classroom learning through an authentic learning experience, one that was "relevant from the learner's perspective and situated within appropriate social contexts" (Stein, Isaacs, & Trish, 2004, p. 239). Authentic learning has been shown to "assist students to develop appropriate and effective understandings" by bridging formal learning and learning within real-life communities (Stein, Isaacs, & Trish, 2004, p. 239). As collaboration between the VTLCI and CEP continues, pre- and post-testing serves to gauge learner outcomes and identify other areas of mutual benefit. These two distinct programs, one pre-academic and one graduate level, housed in the same building but meeting at different times of the day, were unlikely partners until the program directors looked beyond superficial differences to the potential bond their respective students could share.

Biography

Andrea Todd is associate director of Virginia Tech's Language and Culture Institute. Previously she served as director of graduate affairs at National Defense University. Dr. Todd holds a doctorate in education from George Washington University, an MA in linguistics from George Mason University, and a BS in Spanish from Georgetown University.


Full Session

1.3.3. Promoting Second Language Learning through Service-Learning: University Students and English Language Learners Together in the Classroom
Location: Anderson 120

Presenters
Andrea Varricchio, PhD; Angela Della Valle, MA TESOL; Cathryn Crosby, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

This session will discuss bilingual service-learning projects and internships and the ways that university students make real language and cultural connections. University students serve as tutors to immigrants in ESL programs at area schools and agencies. Two presenters will address the pedagogical benefits of the internship to university students, and the third presenter will discuss the impact that university students have on middle-school English language learners. The session will provide models for participants to construct similar collaborations between students who are native speakers of English and immigrant students.

Biographies

Andrea Varricchio, PhD, is a professor of Spanish and linguistics in the Department of Languages and Cultures at West Chester University of Pennsylvania and teaches courses in Spanish language and linguistics. Dr. Varricchio has presented at numerous conferences and has published in the fields of foreign-language methodology, service learning, and functional linguistics.

Angela Della Valle, MA TESOL, teaches ESL/language arts at Upper Merion Area Middle School, where she is the ESL Department head. She is the editor of the ESL newsletter, News from the ESL Corner. In addition, she teaches the West Chester University course Teaching English Language Learners PK-12.

Cathryn Crosby, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Languages and Cultures at West Chester University of Pennsylvania, where she teaches courses in the Teaching of English as a Second Language. Her research interests include Generation 1.5 learners, multiple literacies, and using technology in the language classroom.

 

Theme: Globalization and Transnationalization in Higher Education

Individual Presentations

1.4.1. Helping Students Gain Access to Higher Education
Location: Brandywine 04

Title
One Hundred Thousand Strong

Presenter
Oscar Avila – Cultural Affairs Director of the Embassy of the United States in Costa Rica

Abstract

One Hundred Thousand Strong, a project of the Embassy of the United States in Costa Rica, has begun to increase the number of Latin American students in universities in the United States.

Biography

Oscar Avila is the cultural affairs director of the Embassy of the United States in Costa Rica.

Title
Cooperation between educational institutions: overcoming the distance barrier to student migration

Presenters
Ludmilla Aufurth, J. Knoben, H. Raab – Tilburg University, Netherlands
B. Kaashoek – Dialogic Innovator, Utrecht

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

The study investigates student choices at the transition from secondary to higher education. In line with common gravity models of migration, we observe that the size of student flows between schools and universities decreases with increasing geographical distance. We use population data covering different cohorts of secondary-school graduates to show how cooperation between educational institutions can help to overcome this distance barrier. The results of our analysis show that certain cooperation strategies can counteract this distance decay.

Biography

Ludmilla Aufurth is a sociologist and research master student in the program of organization studies at Tilburg University, Netherlands. Her research focuses on higher-education institutions, the intersection of science and technology, innovation studies, and organizational cooperation/networks.

Title
Reasons and factors for obtaining PhDs abroad: the case of Arab Palestinians from Israel

Presenter
Dr. Kussai Haj Yehia – Academic College of Beit Berl, Israel

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

The purpose of the paper is to examine the phenomenon of Arab Palestinian Israeli graduates who choose to obtain PhD degrees abroad, especially from the U.S.A. and Western European universities. This paper shows "pull" factors that entice these graduates to complete their PhD degrees abroad and "push" factors that deter them from continuing their studies in Israel. It also deals with the added value of studying abroad for them and its impact on their academic careers and on shaping a new "academic identity" back home. The importance of the paper is that it presents an up-to-date comprehensive picture of this phenomenon.

Biography

Kussai Haj Yehia, a senior lecturer at the Academic College of Beit Berl, Israel, completed his higher education in Israel and Germany. He deals with issues of academics, higher education, immigration, and studying abroad among Arab Palestinians from Israel. His recent publication deals with the "Jordanization of Higher Education among Arabs in Israel."

1.4.2. Teaching Global Higher Education 1
Location: Brandywine 31

Title
Developing a global model for teaching the basic course in intercultural communication

Presenter
Anita Foeman, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract

The goal of this session is to explore the possibility of offering West Chester University's course Intercultural Communication (COM250) as an international online class. Currently, COM250 addresses diversity in a very western/American centered manner. The class does explore cultural frames relevant to international societies and includes speakers from countries outside the United States. Still, the majority of class members are American born. The class is currently being taught in a hybrid format, and a future goal is to offer sections fully online and include students from around the world. In this session, we will explore the opportunities and challenges.

Biography

Anita Foeman, PhD, is a professor of communication studies at West Chester University. She conducts research on diversity in multiple settings. Her current projects explore ancestry DNA and racial identity. She also conducts interview research with interracial couples. Dr. Foeman is under contract with Wadsworth Learning for an intercultural communication text.


Title
Promoting a community of practice to support best practices in teaching global content

Presenter
Stephanie Laggini Fiore – Temple University

Abstract

Temple University's Teaching & Learning Center created a year-long, interdisciplinary Faculty Learning Community to support development of faculty who teach global content. The group identified a need for communities of interdisciplinary scholars with which to share best practices and challenges, both within and across universities. In the spirit of the "repositories movement," the circle has been developing a peer-reviewed electronic resource, the Marco Polo Collaborative, to provide access to open-source educational materials. Participants in this session will consider ways to encourage the creation of communities of practice both through faculty learning communities on campus and through participation in open-source forums.

Biography

Stephanie Laggini Fiore is associate director of the Teaching & Learning Center and an associate professor of Italian at Temple University. She is a member of the Marco Polo Collaborative, a globalization teaching circle. Her research interests include gender representation in Italian literature and student motivations in foreign-language learning.


Full Session

1.4.3. Teaching Asia: Prospects and Challenges
Location: Anderson 111

Presenters
Cecilia Chien, Valerian DeSousa, Lawrence Davidson – West Chester University

Abstract

Our panel addresses the challenges of teaching about the cultures and societies of Asia in a way that is not static and that incorporates the layered spatial and temporal histories of the people. Dr. Cecilia Chien's presentation, entitled "Teaching China in the Age of Globalization," posits how our understanding of China today must be placed in the context of its roots in the past. Chinese systems and practices often stand diametrically opposed to those of the West. Any attempt to teach about China today has to address the rich intellectual and cultural traditions that undergird the modern nation. Dr. Valerian DeSousa's presentation, entitled "South Asia in a Historical Perspective," looks at the importance of understanding the nations of the region through a history that explores their connections with Central and West Asia, East Africa and the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and China. Dr. Lawrence Davidson's presentation, entitled "Getting beyond the U.S. Paradigm in Teaching Modern Middle East History," deconstructs the many myths that exist about the Middle East and locates our understanding outside of the narrow paradigm that is driven by geopolitical interest.

Biographies

Dr. Cecilia Chien is an associate professor and assistant chairperson in the Department of History at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include the regional history of middle-imperial China, kinship and genealogy, development in the Yangzi Delta, and Asian-American studies. She teaches courses on pre-modern and modern East Asia, the Asian-American experience, and world civilizations.

Dr. Valerian DeSousa is an assistant professor of sociology at West Chester University. His research interests include the study of colonial law in South Asia, the Indian Ocean Trade, and the Indian Diaspora.

Dr. Lawrence Davidson is a professor of history at West Chester University. His research focuses on the history of United States relations with the Middle East. He has published extensively in this area, and his most recent book is entitled Foreign Policy, Inc.: Privatizing American National Interest.

Session 2 (Wednesday: 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM)

 

Theme: Technology

Individual Presentations

2.1.1. Strengthening Science Education
Location: Merion 112

Title
Education as a link between academia and society: an example of biotechnology in the Costa Rican society

Presenter
Lilliana Piedra – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

In order to assess the level of knowledge that people have regarding biotechnological concepts, the presenters produced a survey on general aspects of the subject. The survey was conducted in four sectors of society: college students (29), persons not related to the academy (29), high-school seniors (53), and high-school biology teachers (30), for a total of 141 surveys. In conclusion we can establish that a large gap exists between the knowledge generated in universities and that of other sectors of society, hence the importance of strengthening education at all levels, especially secondary education, and developing texts and materials to help make biotechnology classes more attractive to students. The ultimate goal is to lead young people to apply critical thinking to new scientific developments.

Biography

Lilliana Piedra holds a degree in marine biology and a master's degree in wildlife management and conservation. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in natural sciences for development. She works in the Universidad Nacional School of Biological Sciences and has been involved in the process of biodiversity conservation with social participation.

Title
Working to strengthen the secondary school system within the public university A case Study: Scientific High Schools in Costa Rica

Presenter
Geovanni Jiménez – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Learning the discipline of science is a basic human necessity; science is all around us. Modern life cannot be understood without science, and few people would contest that science has brought many advances to society. Costa Rica, as a developing country, has established a national law, the Law for Promotion of Scientific and Technological Development (Act 7169), with the aim of becoming a fully developed nation. A case study describes the importance of supporting the teaching of science and also seeks to explain the main objectives of the scientific secondary schools in Costa Rica.

Biography

Geovanni Jiménez is an agricultural engineer and graduated from the Technological Institute of Costa Rica. He conducted postgraduate studies in rural development at Utah State University, U.S.A., and took doctoral courses at the University of Chapingo, Mexico. He is a professor and dean of the Brunca campus of Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. His activities include teaching, research, and extension work.


2.1.2. Using Technology to Connect
Location: Brandywine 04

Title
Overcoming the barriers of online assessment: effective use of Web-facilitated and blended instructional delivery models

Presenters
Courtney L. McLaughlin, PhD, NCSP – Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Jonathan R. Brown, PhD – Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Web-facilitated and blended instructional delivery models have been gaining momentum in education. The power, accessibility, and complexity of online learning have placed increased pressure on the development of effective online assessment, which should always guide instructional decisions (Okolo, 2011). One component of online learning is formative and summative assessment—the knowledge students acquire during the learning process and the knowledge students have after instruction of a content area. Online assessment presents several challenges and barriers to instructors.

Biographies

Courtney L. McLaughlin, PhD, NCSP, is certified as a school psychologist by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the National School Psychology Certification Board. Currently, she is an assistant professor in the Educational and School Psychology Department at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Dr. McLaughlin has published and presented on topics including school-based mental health, cognitive-behavioral therapy, children and adolescents at risk, social emotional disorders, stress, standardized testing, disproportionality, and the training of future school psychologists. She utilizes a blended instructional delivery model with the courses she teaches at IUP.
Jonathan R. Brown, PhD, is a professor at Clarion University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Brown is a graduate of the Pennsylvania State University with an emphasis in audiology, acoustical physics, and statistics. He teaches measurement and assessment to senior undergraduate secondary-education majors and research and statistics to graduate students. His courses are taught, in whole or in part, online. His area of research, presentations, and publications is in theoretical and applied statistical analysis of measurement instruments.

Title
Integration of communication and information technologies (ICT) in the informal productive sectors from a sustainable vision

Presenter
Juan Carlos Sandí Delgado – Universidad de Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

This paper describes the University of Costa Rica, Guápiles Branch, project entitled Inclusion of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in Business Management of Productive Informal Sectors. This project provides technological tools to integrate informal sectors of production into businesses to improve the groups' quality of life from a technical, cultural, and production perspective and to empower related initiatives. It was concluded that the interests of the target populations do not point to a comprehensive development model. Instead, the researchers learned from their experiences with the individual resources and sustainability model for each community.

Biography

Juan Carlos Sandí Delgado earned his master's degree in university administration. He also holds degrees in the design and development of educational spaces with information technology and communication and in systems engineering. He is on the faculty of the University of Costa Rica and coordinates an academic community work project and several outreach teaching projects.


Theme: Sustainability

 Individual Presentations

2.2.1. Women’s Issues in International Education 1
Location: Merion 113

Title
Daughters, all of them; mothers, some of them: the relationship among women in a globalized world

Presenters
Eva Samqui, Juliana Francis – Universidad de las Regiones Autónomas de la Costa Caribe Nicaragüense, Nicaragua

Abstract

From a feminist approach, the speakers explore mother-daughter relationships along with changes in society and, specifically, in universities. The presenters look at the impact the findings have on higher education. Women's mother-daughter relationships have the potential to spread changes for women and society. The mother-daughter relationship is fundamental to joint and equitable societies. Therefore, social research and academic studies are challenged to take on mother-daughter relationships as work objectives.

Biographies

Juliana Francis holds a graduate degree in science education, as well as a degree in English. For 16 years, she has been a teacher and researcher at the Universidad de las Regiones Autónomas de la Costa Caribe Nicaragüense. She is currently the coordinator of the Center for Study and Information on Multiethnic Women – New Guinea Campus.

Eva Samqui is a feminist activist in the Nicaraguan Women's Movement. She holds degrees in journalism and the sciences from the Independent National University of Nicaragua and holds a master's degree in gender and development. She is currently the director of the Asociación de Mujeres Profesionales por el Desarrollo Integral (AMPDI).

Title
Wangari Maathai and a global rhetoric of sustainability

Presenter
William B. Lalicker, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Wangari Maathai of Kenya—environmentalist, democracy activist, women's rights champion, legislator, first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize—accomplished her successes by deploying a "rhetoric of sustainability": a discourse galvanizing support among the formerly powerless at the same time that it spoke truth to power. That discourse invoked terms connected to traditional African tribal values; to respect for women and their potential power in society; and, analogically, to more globally recognized terms of sustainability, progressive economics, and environmentalism. Maathai's rhetoric thus fits with that of Burke and Olbrechts-Tyteca on the continuum of transformative social and civic rhetorics.

Biography

William B. Lalicker (PhD, University of Washington, Seattle) researches intercultural rhetorical theory and pedagogy as applied to English composition programs. Currently he is a professor of English and the dean's assistant for student issues in the College of Arts and Sciences at West Chester University.

Theme: Best Practices in Higher Education

 Individual Presentations

2.3.1. Model Teaching Programs 1
Location: Anderson 120

Title
Motivation in the teaching-learning process in the physical-education classroom at the Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo during the year 2011-2012

Presenter
Sandy Portorreal, Cesarina Bencosme – Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

Abstract

This presentation discusses a way of addressing a teaching challenge by aiming to produce significant changes in how students learn as they face their own training process and in how teachers teach. The research has identified a lack of motivation that affects the performance of students in the learning process and limits the ways in which they assimilate information during tasks. Action research has been identified as a way to address the issue of lack of motivation because it involves a dual role: the teacher seeks to allow students to learn and to try to change their own practice.

Biographies

Sandy Portorreal's background includes baccalaureate degrees in social communication and physical education, master's degrees in higher education and teacher training, and a Merit in Physical Education Teaching 2007 award given by the Ministry of Education. Current responsibilities include serving as professor and academic coordinator for physical education at the Autonomous University of Santo Domingo.

Cesarina Bencosme's academic background is in education, educational planning, and the training of trainers. She heads the Unit of Planning and Institutional Development, Campus Núñez Molina, and is director of the Department of Philosophy and Letters.

Title
A program to improve the quality of teaching: a learning experience from the point of view of the teacher and student in the pharmaceutical major at the Universidad de Costa Rica

Presenters
María del Carmen Acuña – Universidad de Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

This paper presents the project Teaching Improvement Program: Innovation in the Classrooms of the Faculty of Pharmacy, developed at the University of Costa Rica, as an initiative to improve teaching and student learning. The paper presents the background for the project, the methodology used, and the results obtained in the two years of implementation. It also describes the advice that the Academic Evaluation Centre has provided to the program. In general, the activities have been well received by the students and have fulfilled the objectives of the project.

Biography

María del Carmen Acuña holds a degree in psychology and has worked primarily for the University of Costa Rica as a teacher and researcher. She currently works in the Center for Academic Evaluation, where her chief responsibilities are in the areas of curriculum-design processes, evaluation and innovation in teaching, and higher-education research issues.

Title
Entrepreneurship Education: Challenges and Prospects in Nigeria

Presenters
Roibito Ekpiken-Ekanem, Ph.D. , Associate Professor and Head of Department, Cross River University of Technology (CRUTECH), Calabar, Nigeria

David Otu Effiom, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Cross River University of Technology (CRUTECH), Calabar, Nigeria

Abstract

Prosperity, progress and development of any nation depend on the nation's ability to have a self-reliant and resilient economy capable of generating an internally self-sustaining growth. Entrepreneurship is a tool for empowering people for job creation. This paper therefore seeks to explore the challenges of effective implementation of the current entrepreneurship education curriculum in Nigeria with the hope of repositioning it in line with global best practice. This study adopted the descriptive survey method; used 4 research questions and a sample of 300 academic staff (165 males and 135 females) drawn from 4 tertiary institutions in Nigeria. The Academic Staff Assessment of Entrepreneurship Skills Development Inventory (ASAESDI) and the Accidental Sampling method were used for a stress-free collection of data for the study. The items were constructed on the 4-point Likert-type to reflect each of the major variables. The scores were arranged in a Person-by-Item Matrix Table and used for data analysis. The results showed that the current entrepreneurship curriculum is not adequate in imparting skills on learners in tertiary institutions; the facilitators in tertiary institutions are competent enough to train the learners on entrepreneurship skills development; the learning environment in tertiary institutions are not conducive enough as such needs a lot of focus to uplift their present status and that funding of entrepreneurship skills development programme in tertiary institutions is not adequate. Based on these results, appropriate recommendations were proffered to rejuvenate a good learning environment in the tertiary institutions for the benefit of the State and Nation at large with emphasis on the creation of awareness for independence and self reliance on the part of the general populace from total dependence on government Ministries and Parastatals in terms of employment.

Biographies

Roibito Ekpiken- Ekanem, Ph.D is a lifelong activist for women's human rights, an experienced trainer in various areas including conflict resolution, consultancy, an Associate Professor of Guidance and Counselling and Education in the Department of Educational Foundations and Administration, the emeritus Head of Department of Educational Foundations, Administration, Guidance and Counselling as well as Dean, Faculty of Educational Foundations and Administration, Cross River University of Technology, CRUTECH, Calabar. She is the founder and Executive Director of Women in Action for Positive Development and Gender Enhancement Centre (WAPDAGEC) former Women Action Organisation (WAO). She is the immediate past Director-General of the Management Development Institute (MDI), Calabar. She ensured that gender was mainstreamed (in all spheres of life) into activities and programmes as the Programme Manager for South South and South East USAID / Office of the Transition Initiatives (OTI) and Programme Consultant of the Western Niger Delta Development Programme (WNDDP), Rivers, Delta and Lagos States for the International Foundation for Education and Self Help (IFESH), respectively. She is a recipient of National and International awards in recognition of her works. Notable awards include meritorious award for excellent performance by Nigerian Institute of Public Relations, Cross River State (NIPR-CRS) Chapter, meritorious award for excellent performance by United States Agency for International Development/Office of Transition Initiatives (USAID/OTI), Washington D.C as well as the Nigerian Office; 2008 Best Administrator of the Year Leadership Distinction Award presented by NOYA South South zone in recognition of outstanding leadership as woman leader, administrator and Director – General, Management Development Institute (MDI), Calabar, Cross River State as well as the AMAZON Award from Cross River State. She is an erudite scholar and has carried out several researches, written several books, published fifty international and national articles; authored and co-authored six books; organised several national and state conferences, seminars and workshops mostly on women issues. She is also a member of several national and international organisations like Women in Nigeria (WIN). Roibito is currently the Head of Department of Educational Foundations and Administration, CRUTECH, Calabar as well as the National Treasurer for Counselling Association of Nigeria (CASSON).

David Otu Effiom, Ph.D is an Associate Professor of Guidance and Counselling and Education in the Department of Educational Foundations and Administration. He had been the Head of Department of Educational Foundations and Administration, Faculty of Education, Cross River University of Technology, CRUTECH, Calabar. He is an exemplary scholar and has conducted several researches, written several books, published fifty-five international and national articles authored and co-authored ten books; attended several International, national and state conferences, seminars and workshops. He is also a member of several national and international organisations like Counselling Association of Nigeria (CASSON).

Full Session

2.3.2. Distance Education – We All Have Stories
Location: Anderson 103

Presenters
Moderator: Patricia Beneš, MS – 3E Institute, West Chester University.
Connie L. DiLucchio, EdD; Michelle Fisher, MS; Rui Li, PhD; Christian Penny, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract

We have all shared stories about distance education—good, bad, and even occasionally bizarre experiences. This session will be guided by a team that includes distance-education specialists, West Chester University faculty now migrating courses online, and one total novice to the process of developing, migrating, implementing, and evaluating distance-education courses. Participants will discuss such questions as these: What are the advantages of this mode of course delivery? What are the drawbacks? How does distance education free and empower both learner and instructor, and when does it become a cause of burnout and dismay? What were your doubts starting out, and how did you resolve them? Participants will share their reflections and digital examples of glittering gems and nasty monsters they have encountered in creating distance-education courses, or have imagined in considering teaching online. The session will be hosted by West Chester University's 3E Institute, which is devoted to helping educators to "inspire, innovate, collaborate, and connect to the world."

Biographies

Patricia Beneš, MS (West Chester University), is the executive director of the Institute for Educational Excellence and Entrepreneurship (3E Institute) at West Chester University. She has many years' experience as a senior higher-education administrator and advancement professional. She is responsible for 3E programming, outreach, marketing, and administration.

Connie L. DiLucchio, EdD (University of Pennsylvania), taught in public K-12 schools and at the university level before joining the faculty at West Chester University. As associate professor and graduate coordinator for her department, she works with students in the Post-Baccalaureate Certification and MEd Programs and teaches courses on educational change and teacher research.

Michelle Fisher, MS (Lehigh University), is the senior instructional designer for teacher education for the College of Education (COE) at West Chester University. She assists COE faculty in designing and developing new online courses and programs. Michelle has been designing and developing online courses in higher education for over ten years.

Rui Li, PhD (University of Texas), is the executive director in the Office of Distance Education at West Chester University. She is a scholar of distance education and instructional technology. She has published in peer-reviewed journals and has presented at conferences and taught face-to-face and online courses, both nationally and internationally.

Christian Penny, PhD (Penn State University), is an associate professor of instructional technology in the West Chester University Department of Professional and Secondary Studies, a 3E Institute key faculty leader, an Apple Distinguished Educator, and winner of the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. He is also a consultant, published author, ISTE member, and model entrepreneurial educator.

Theme: Globalization and Transnationalization in Higher Education

Individual Presentations

2.4.1. The Effect of Globalization upon Higher Education 1
Location: Anderson 111

Title
Contract for globalization

Presenter
Cheer-Sun Yang, PhD

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

In the beginning of the 21st century, some uncontrollable challenges are confronting all educators and higher-education institutions. For example, a stagnant economy causes tremendous pressure on local students and can cause the retention rate to deteriorate as a result. One of the solutions to current challenges is to embrace globalization. While globalization can provide a solution, poor contracts can open another can of worms. In this presentation, some relevant issues are presented for discussion. These include admission criteria, transfer credits, and graduation requirements, all of which become critical. A good contract, known as a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), must take these issues into account.

Biography

Dr. Cheer-Sun Yang received his PhD in CIS from the University of Delaware. A native of Taiwan, Dr. Yang devotes his international experiences toward globalization with Taiwanese universities. In 2011, for example, he visited National Hsinchu University of Education, Tamkang University, and Chinese Culture University; two resulting MOUs are under review.

Title
Developments and changes in the academic profession in Taiwan

Presenter
Hsiou-Hsia Tai – Chung-Hua University

Abstract

Taiwanese higher education has gone through dramatic changes in the past two decades due to political and economic liberalization. Notable policy changes include (1) diminishing state subsidies for the sector and the modification of its funding mechanism, (2) growing demands for accountability, (3) increasingly tighter bonds between universities and industry, (4) attempts to establish stronger ties with the international academic community, and (5) the pursuit of academic excellence. As a consequence, the academic profession in Taiwan has recently been facing some challenges, including increasing workload and pressure, more rigorous standards for evaluation and promotion, a more competitive academic labor market, a rigid and unreasonable salary scheme, and brain drain. Among these, the issues arising from brain drain, the salary scheme, and evaluations have caused widespread concern and discussions, not only in academia but also in society at large. This paper analyzes the factors affecting the academic profession, the corresponding policy initiatives, and their impact on the development of the academic profession in Taiwan.

Biography

(Unavailable)


Theme: Funding for Higher Education

Individual Presentations

2.5.1. Best Practices in Winning External Grants
Location: 25 University Avenue 162

Presenter
Michael Ehi Ayewoh – West Chester University

Abstract

Participants will be exposed to a comprehensive model of external-grants development and effective administration that is based on attribution theorem and loci of control research into practice. This outstanding model is inclusive of the following three critical and functional factors: 1) you, the prospective or actual project investigator (internal locus of control); 2) your college offices of sponsored programs, appropriate external funding agencies, and others (external locus of control), and 3) the interaction effects between internal and external loci of control.

Biography

Dr. Michael Ayewoh is the associate vice president of sponsored research at West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. He is the recipient of major federal, state, and private grants; an external reviewer of grant proposals; a workshop presenter and trainer; and a member of state, national, and international sponsored-research and program administration.

Session 3 (Wednesday: 3:00 PM – 4:15 PM)


Theme: Technology

Individual Presentations

3.1.1. Teaching Using Distance Education
Location: Merion 112

Title
Distance learning: challenges and opportunities in the global community

Presenter
John H. Hanson, PhD – West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

This paper explores challenges in technology-based education at institutions of higher learning in major African and other developing countries. It offers suggestions, based on best practices, to overcome them. The paper begins with an analysis of the primary reasons for distance education in developing countries and compares and contrasts them with those suggested by American universities. Finally, this paper updates the systematic literature review on the quality indicators of distance-learning programs. Specifically, it focuses on student support services such as library, admissions and financial aid, and academic advising; evaluation and assessment of instructional techniques and delivery; electronic security; and faculty support services for course development and delivery.

Biography

A veteran journalist, Dr. John H. Hanson has taught journalism and English courses at WCU since fall 2000. He holds a PhD in mass communications from Florida State University, an MA in journalism from Syracuse University, and a BA from the University of Liberia. He worked as editor/reporter for the Associated Press, Asbury Park Press, and Syracuse Herald Journal.


Title
Using online graduate and doctoral programs to create global villages of interdisciplinary problem-solvers in public health, environmental science, and public policy

Presenters
Darrell Norman Burrell – George Mason University
Andrea Todd – Virginia Tech

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Collaboration and technological innovation are critical to innovative, global, multinational, and knowledge-driven economies. Traditional learning communities in graduate and doctoral programs tend to include local and regional students and to rely heavily upon face-to-face interaction; however, distance learning and computer technology have the ability to extend these communities across geographical boundaries. Online graduate and doctoral programs allow for the development of diverse global communities, which, as a result of their diverse background and experiences, can develop fresh solutions to some of the most complex problems.

Biographies

Andrea Todd is associate director of Virginia Tech's Language and Culture Institute. Previously she served as director of graduate affairs at National Defense University. Dr. Todd holds a doctorate in education from George Washington University, an MA in linguistics from George Mason University, and a BS in Spanish from Georgetown University.

Darrell Norman Burrell is a post-doctoral graduate student. He is a former Presidential Management Fellow and is a faculty member at George Mason University. He also teaches in the Doctor of Health Sciences Program at A.T. Still University. He teaches in the online "green" MBA in sustainability development at Marylhurst University. He received a doctoral degree in health education in environmental public health from A.T. Still University. He has an EdS (post-master's terminal degree) in higher-education administration from George Washington University, two graduate degrees in human-resources management and management from National Louis University, and a graduate degree in sales and marketing management from Prescott College.


Title
Teaching communication research across the globe

Presenter
Maria A. (Ola) Kopacz, PhD; Philip A. Thompsen, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract

This presentation will discuss the experience of teaching a distance-education class in a true sense of the word "distance": During spring 2012, the instructor of the course COM 224 Communication Research taught the class to WCU students remotely from Poland, Europe. The presenters will discuss the exciting opportunities and challenges of teaching such a class.

Biographies

Maria (Ola) Kopacz, PhD, is an assistant professor in the WCU Department of Communication Studies. Her research interests focus on the potential of new media (especially social networks) to spread ideas and empower people in contexts such as education, news, and entertainment. She teaches courses in communication research and mass media.

Philip A. Thompsen, PhD, holds the rank of professor in the WCU Department of Communication Studies. Dr. Thompsen is a scholar of communication media and technology, with particular interests in broadcasting and computer-mediated communication. He is the department's webmaster and educational technology coordinator.


Theme: Sustainability

3.2.1 Women's Issues in International Education 2
Location: Merion 113

Title
Women's access to higher education in Afghanistan: understanding the current situation

Presenter
Noorullah Elham

Abstract

Higher education institutions in Afghanistan are currently open to both male and female applicants, and 19.9% of the students enrolled in such institutions were female in the 2009-2010 academic year. While this number is a vast improvement compared to Afghan universities under the Taliban regime, when women were outlawed from becoming students at all, there is still an obvious gender gap that needs to be understood if efforts are going to be made to create greater equity and equality for women in higher education in Afghanistan. The story of female access to higher education in Afghanistan is interesting, with some governments strongly supporting women's education in general and some outlawing it due to conservative ideas about the social roles of men and women. Today, the government is obliged to provide equal educational opportunities to men and women starting in primary school through their university degree. Unfortunately, women are continuing to encounter barriers, hurdles, and set-backs on their way to obtaining access to a higher degree. This research worked to identify some of these barriers, hurdles, and set-backs from multiple higher-education stakeholders, from heads of universities to professors, university staff, students, non-students, and parents. Street interviews were also conducted in the local bazaars of university towns to capture local sentiments regarding higher education for women. The research was done in seven different provinces of Afghanistan, providing a good geographical coverage in the hopes of capturing the largest variety of opinions and experiences. Women's access to higher education in Afghanistan can be improved; however, all efforts to do so should try to take a long-term perspective, one that focuses on the students of today and the future, and not just on the short-term and rarely sustainable projects with immediate impact that are so often favored by development funders. The women of Afghanistan and the country as a whole deserve the right to see what positive impacts an increased number of educated women can produce.

Biography

(Unavailable)

Title
Role of fieldtrips in promoting inclusion in higher education

Presenter
Dr. Kalyani Akalamkam – Lady Shri Ram Collage for Women, Delhi University, New Delhi, India

Abstract

Fieldtrips promote inclusion in higher education by creating spaces for students' overall development and transforming them from "mere learners" to community beings. To bring about such transformation, an affirmative program titled REACH (Reaffirming Equity Access Capacity and Humanism) has been created. REACH is a program of the Foundation for Academic Excellence and Access, Lady Shri Ram College for Women, New Delhi. REACH was designed to nurture the quest for excellence and to be a crucial catalyst in empowering women students from diverse backgrounds, especially students with social and economic disadvantages. The need-centered approach adopted by REACH includes experiential workshops, fieldtrips, and training programs. As one of the faculty advisors to this project, I am involved in organizing and facilitating long-distance fieldtrips lasting four-to-six days. These fieldtrips have provided a platform for the development of interpersonal interactions, life skills, and sensitivity towards environmental and gender issues.

Biography

Dr. Kalyani Akalamkam is a senior assistant professor in the Department of Education, Lady Shri Ram Collage for Women (LSR), Delhi University, New Delhi, and at present is heading her department. Her research focuses on teacher education, science education, and environmental education, and she has published in her fields. She has been teaching courses in the pedagogy of environmental studies for seven years. Dr. Kalyani Akalamkam has been the staff advisor for the college's environmental society. She has also authored a chapter on education for sustainable development and conducted several workshops for school teachers on the teaching and assessment of science and environmental science. Her doctoral thesis is in the area of physics education and is from Delhi University.


Title
The economic, political, and social status of women in four municipalities of New Guinea

Presenter
Juliana Francis – Universidad de las Regiones Autónomas de la Costa Caribe Nicaragüense, Nicaragua

Abstract

This session presents interesting work being done in an area of Nicaragua with the lowest human-development indices. The work describes and quantifies the situation for women, who represent 50% of the wealth of the area. The research concludes that the most important reasons women from the four municipalities have difficulty accessing credit are a lack of title deeds on behalf of women, the numerous requirements for receiving financing, the high interest rates that apply to loans, and the prevailing level of unemployment among women. Other limiting factors include the obstacles preventing women's organizations from working cooperatively and the lack of a shared vision for business development.

Biography

Juliana Francis holds a graduate degree in science education, as well as a degree in English. For 16 years, she has been a teacher and researcher at the Universidad de las Regiones Autónomas de la Costa Caribe Nicaragüense. She is currently the coordinator of the Center for Study and Information on Multiethnic Women – New Guinea Campus.


Theme: Sustainability

Full Session

3.2.2 Validity in Studies on Health Science: The Role of Statistics
Location: 25 University Avenue 162

Presenter
Juan José Romero Zúñiga, DVM, MSc, PhD – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract

The role of the researcher is to generate new knowledge or to validate pre-existing knowledge in both the local and the international environment. In this process, it is the duty of the researchers to conduct their research under the strictest standards of quality using all the available tools and understanding quality in terms of validity. In the pursuit of this goal, writing appropriate, relevant, and scientifically well-founded research protocols is crucial. The validity must be at least internal (extrapolated to the target population) and, if possible, external (extrapolated to the universe). Then the validity, composed of representativeness (absence of systematic error) and precision (absence of random error), will give the possibility of generating productive, quality, and robust new knowledge. In this scientific exercise, simple formulae for sample-size calculation and simple tests for data analysis offer researchers the possibility of valid studies that are repeatable and subject to testing by others. The learning objectives for this session include recognizing the types of health-sciences studies, becoming familiar with sampling strategies, and knowing and using the sample-size calculation formula suited to each study.

Biography

Juan José Romero Zúñiga began his career in 1998 as an academic in the Universidad Nacional School of Veterinary Medicine (EMV-UNA) in the Departments of Reproduction and Herd Health. In 2000 he joined the academic staff of the Regional Postgraduate Program in Tropical Veterinary Science (PCVET), teaching courses in the areas of epidemiology and sustainable animal production. Since 2002 he has been the academic coordinator for the master's degree in epidemiology at PCVET. From 1999 to 2005 he was a member of the Quantitative Veterinary Epidemiology Group of the University of Wageningen, in the Netherlands. Included in his EMV-UNA activities are the development, implementation, and maintenance of a national dairy information system through the software VAMPP Bovino, which has been developed in the Regional Centre of Informatics in Sustainable Animal Production (CRIPAS) of the Population Medicine Research Program (MedPob). His specialties are epidemiology, animal production, and herd health. Among his main topics of study and research are the causes of problems of fertility or abortion in cattle. He has been a tutor for nearly a dozen graduate and postgraduate theses in several areas of epidemiology applied to diseases that affect animal and human populations, as well as health and animal production issues. He has more than 60 publications in specialized journals, as well as nearly a hundred papers in both national and international congresses. He has also been part of the group of authors of a book on reproduction in domestic animals. Currently he is the coordinator-professor for the UNA Departments of Epidemiology, Animal Production, and Herd Health. He is also the academic coordinator for the master's degree in epidemiology for UNA's regional postgraduate program in tropical veterinary sciences.


Theme: Best Practices in Higher Education

Individual Presentations

3.3.1. Support Services in Higher Education 2
Location: Anderson 120

Title
TEAM-UNA friendship: UNA students serving the community

Presenters
Lenna Barrantes, Cinthya Olivares – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Team-UNA Amistad is an academic project of the Universidad Nacional, Brunca Extension, that provides the high-school community with free English tutorials. Teachers and students participating in this project have the common goal of preparing high-school seniors to pass the National Standardized English Test by participating in weekly tutoring sessions. This national examination measures students' language proficiency through a reading comprehension paper-and-pencil test. Professors and students from the English teaching major involved in this project share the goal of both improving high-school seniors' English proficiency and strengthening student-teachers' language-instruction skills.

Biographies

Lenna Barrantes Elizondo holds a bachelor's degree in English teaching, a licentiate's degree in applied linguistics in English, and a master's degree in second languages and culture with emphasis in English from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. During her 12 years of teaching experience, she has taught in different areas, including teaching for the Ministry of Public Education as a primary-school teacher and a teachers' trainer for in-service teachers. She is currently a professor at Universidad Nacional, Brunca Extension, in the English teaching major and the associate's program in English. She has also worked for other private and public institutions.

Cinthya Olivares Garita holds a licentiate's degree in applied linguistics in English and a master's degree in second languages and culture with emphasis in English from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. She is currently teaching at Universidad Nacional, Brunca Extension, in the English Department. She has worked for 12 years teaching students of all levels: primary, secondary, and university. She is a developer of the project CI-UNA (Centro de Idiomas, Universidad Nacional). She has also taught courses at other private and public institutions, participated in national conferences for teachers of English, and been a trainer for several courses for in-service MEP teachers.


Title
Evolution of synchronicity in consortia creations

Presenter
Stephen Martin – West Chester University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Synchronicity roughly means causally unrelated events unlikely to occur together by chance, but observed to occur together in a meaningful manner. The author was taken by the impression that much of the Northern Hemisphere shares considerable information by means of indexes and database access, while many of the Latin American scholarly publications tend not to enter the dominant English reference sources. Latin America has created tools to accumulate scholarly resources by electronic means serving the language barrier often needing to be overcome for research. The presentation will describe three services created in Latin America: Latindex, Cybertesis, and SCIelo. They function independently of each other, yet they have potential synchronicity to perform together in a meaningful manner. The presentation will also provide examples of other electronic resources, ElLibroTotal.com and TEEAL, whose functions add synchronicity to other areas of service in academic settings.

Biography

Stephen Marvin has worked with library consortia development in Latin America funded by grants from the International Federation of Library Associations and International Network of Availability of Scientific Publications. For West Chester University, he is the campus copyright coordinator and faculty mentoring program coordinator as well as reference librarian. His publications and presentations address copyright, library consortia, and reference services and include the Dictionary of Scientific Principles (Wiley, 2011).


3.3.2. Teaching Physical Education
Location: Recitation 301

Title
Strategies to improve students’ independent learning at the level of the Licentiate Degree in Physical Education

Presenters
Sandy Portorreal, Atlas Osiris Sosa, Rudy López – Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

Abstract

In the Dominican Republic during the last decade, teacher training in physical education has taken place as part of the undergraduate degree. As a result, more than five-thousand teachers in the Dominican education system have missed this training. In the effort to build quality teachers, there is a need for teachers to be able to self-regulate the learning process itself. Therefore, a team of teachers decided to conduct an action-research study in order to improve the autonomous learning processes.

Biographies

Sandy Portorreal's background includes baccalaureate degrees in social communication and physical education, master's degrees in higher education and teacher training, and a Merit in Physical Education Teaching 2007 award given by the Ministry of Education. Current responsibilities include serving as professor and academic coordinator for physical education at the Autonomous University of Santo Domingo.

Atlas Osiris Sosa's higher education is in the field of physical education. He began his teaching career at Sacred Heart School of Hatico Mao, where he taught for several years before transferring to the Jose Marti Montecristi High School. In 1988 he was invited by Father Joaquin Soler to teach at the Industrial Polytechnic of Santiago. While continuing his teaching career, he earned a law degree at the Universidad Tecnológica de Santiago.

Rudy López studied agricultural science at the Northeast Regional Center campus of the Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo, earned a bachelor's degree in physical education, and has been honored for his excellence in the physical-education field. He is a physical-education teacher with 21 years' experience in the public and private sectors. At the university level, he has taught the courses Recreation I and II, Professional Practice, Baseball, and Professional Leadership.


Title
Educational innovation for improving the teaching-practice curriculum in physical education

Presenters
Sandy Portorreal, Cesarina Bencosme – Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

Abstract

This collaborative initiative seeks to promote educational innovation to improve the educational process in higher education in the Dominican Republic. This project is sponsored by the Ministry of Higher Education Science and Technology and the private sector.

Biographies

Sandy Portorreal's background includes baccalaureate degrees in social communication and physical education, master's degrees in higher education and teacher training, and a Merit in Physical Education Teaching 2007 award given by the Ministry of Education. Current responsibilities include serving as professor and academic coordinator for physical education at the Autonomous University of Santo Domingo.

Cesarina Bencosme's academic background is in education, educational planning, and the training of trainers. She heads the Unit of Planning and Institutional Development, Campus Núñez Molina, and is director of the Department of Philosophy and Letters.


Full Session

3.3.3. Educator Externship: Real World Learning in the 21st Century Workplace
Location: Anderson 103

Presenters
Moderator - Christian Penny – West Chester University
Roundtable:
Robert Corry – The SI Organization
Laura Heikkila – Chester County Economic Development Council
Christine DiPaulo – Jenkintown School District
Lanny Schwartz – East Lancaster School District

Abstract

West Chester University's College of Education offers the 21st Century Educator Externship (EEE 504), a unique graduate course for educators to better understand workforce development needs and how to align curriculum and instruction with regional and state workforce-development goals. The results have been consistently outstanding, based on feedback from educators and business partners. Facilitated by the Institute for Educational Excellence and Entrepreneurship (3E Institute), each educator works collaboratively with an externship partner of his or her choice from business and industry. Participants examine the skills and experiences that are most critical to prepare students for postsecondary education and the 21st century workplace. The externship course provides field experience in an ideal setting for real-world problem solving. This panel discussion is moderated by the course instructor, Dr. Christian Penny. Panelists include teacher externs and company hosts. Audience participation is encouraged.

Biography

Christian Penny, PhD (Penn State University), is an associate professor of instructional technology in the West Chester University Department of Professional and Secondary Studies, a 3E Institute key faculty leader, an Apple Distinguished Educator, and winner of the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. He is also a consultant, published author, ISTE member, and model entrepreneurial educator.


Theme: Globalization and Nationalization of Higher Education

Individual Presentations

3.4.1. Writing, Literature, and the Theater
Location: Anderson 111

Title
Fragmentation and dualism: considerations when envisioning education

Presenter
Carolina Ramírez Guerrero – American International School

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pez)

The most important human creation is writing, which is the link between past and future. The senses are links to our environment and are, therefore, facilitators of information. Fragmentation and division in education lose sight of the whole. Our world can no longer be analyzed from the point of view of duality. The capability approach of Amartya Sen proposes analysis by articulating the quality of life and liberty. Political and economic trends reveal new forms of exclusion. The teaching approach of inclusion and participation as a structural axis can help us understand human diversity and education.

Biography

Carolina Ramírez Guerrero holds an undergraduate degree in education and is currently studying in the Master of Educational Diversity Program at Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. She has also studied social work and English literature. She has been an English teacher at a number of high schools and served as director of career education at the Universidad de las Américas and Universidad Latinoamericana de Ciencia y Tecnología.


Title
The history of theatre in Costa Rica through the voice of their people

Presenter
Paula Rojas – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

This paper shares the conclusions from the first part of the investigation entitled The History of Theatre in Costa Rica: through the protagonists' voices (1970-2000). In this first part, interviews have been conducted with directors, actors, theater technicians, critics, and writers. These interviews are based on an instrument called the "hero's structure," which is based on the hero's myth. The hero's myth is the starting point of this study because it projects itself onto the artist, making the artist's myth and creating an invisible link that synchronizes the spectators, performance, and artists.

Biography

Paula Rojas is an actress, researcher, and professor of theater in the School of Performing Arts at Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. She earned her MA in theatre from the University of Santa Catarina State, Brazil, in 2009. Since then, she has been conducting research on the theatre in Costa Rica.


3.5.1. Advocacy and Funding for Higher Education
Location: Brandywine 04

Title
Working practices of university ombudsmen: input for discussion from the experience of the university commissioner

Presenter
Jorska Gómez – Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras

Abstract

This paper sets out proposals for the work practices of the university ombudsman. The proposals are based on the author's work experiences. These proposals seek to bring to discussion the never-completed and complex nature of the ombudsman's work, as well as the political advocacy required as part of that work.

Biography

Jorska Gómez is a complaints researcher in the University Ombudsman Office of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras, earned a master's degree in human rights education from the National Pedagogical University Francisco Morazán, and holds a BA in law from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras.


Title
Alternative modes of financing higher education: the impact of cost-sharing mechanisms on college access, retention, and social equity in public universities in Ghana

Presenter
Francis Atuahene – West Chester University

Abstract

The massive reliance on central-government and foreign funding for research and other activities in higher education in Ghana has had a diminishing impact on institutions. Over the past decade, universities in Ghana have introduced dynamic cost-sharing strategies as part of their financial-diversification process. While these financial policies have relatively improved institutions' funding, there remain concerns about access, retention, and equity. This presentation discusses the higher-education funding regime in Ghana vis-à-vis the impact of cost-sharing policies on college accessibility amidst the growing demand for participation and the threat of financial austerity facing institutions.

Biography

Francis Atuahene is an assistant professor and faculty advisor in the Pre-Major Advising Center at West Chester University. Dr. Atuahene's area of expertise includes higher education finance-cost sharing, college retention, access and affordability of higher education, and contemporary issues in international comparative higher education.

Session 4 (Thursday: 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM)


Theme: Technology

Full Sessions

4.1.1. Bring Your Own Device "BYOD": Providing IT as a Service
Location: Merion 112

Presenter
Lee Gitzes – Comm Solutions Company

Abstract

Users have always wanted to use their own technology, but until two years ago, doing so was not feasible. Now, with the cloud and virtualization, it is possible to support a consumer BYOD model. If implemented correctly, a modern BYOD-service-based infrastructure can make support far simpler and more cost effective.

Biography

Lee Gitzes is the professional services manager at Comm Solutions Company, where he is responsible for cultivating and growing all technology practices and for project management and customer care services. He is also responsible for managing customer and partner relationships and for recommending new products.


Full Session

4.1.2. Software Solutions to Support Strategic Planning
Location: Anderson 120

Presenter
David Raney – Nuventive CEO

Abstract

Nuventive provides software solutions to support strategic planning as well as academic and operational outcomes management. These solutions support goal-aligned continuous improvement across the institution, allowing you to better meet external demands for accountability as well as achieve your own internal aspirations. Join us to see how you can support a culture of evidence at your institution.

Biography

David Raney has been the CEO of Nuventive since its inception in 2000. In addition, he has served as the CEO of Innervate, a software company focused on health care. Dr. Raney served as chief resident and chief fellow at the University of Colorado and was a faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He received an MD degree from Vanderbilt University.


Theme: Sustainability

Individual Presentations

4.2.1. Promoting Sustainability
Location: Merion 113

Title
Incorporating the values of sustainability and sustainability based on the principles of the Letter to the Earth in higher education, Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Presenter
Lilliana Piedra - Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract

This study was conducted with third-level biology students with emphasis on the tropical biology course within the program Wetlands Ecology and Management in the Universidad Nacional School of Biological Sciences. The study took place from 2008 to 2010 with the active participation of 40 students between 21 and 28 years of age. The study identified an interest in solving social problems that affect environmental issues, including the conservation of ecosystems. We were able to demonstrate the existence of gaps in higher education in the areas of environment, equity, and sustainable development. We pose the possibility of internal and external strategic alliances to engage professionals sensitive to the challenge of a sustainable society.

Biography

Lilliana Piedra holds a degree in marine biology and a master's degree in wildlife management and conservation. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in natural sciences for development. She works in the Universidad Nacional School of Biological Sciences and has been involved in the process of biodiversity conservation with social participation.


Title
Sustainability as an institutional way of a life

Presenter
Ana María González Quirós, Ana Isabel Miranda Villalta, Grettel María Víquez Miranda – Centro Educativo Bilingüe, Nuestra Señora de Lourdes, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Currently the environment is a worldwide concern. Nuestra Señora de Lourdes Bilingual School, a school located in Barva, Heredia, Costa Rica, is aware of environmental issues and through the implementation of pedagogical, concrete, and compatible environmental practices is working hard to foster in its children a lifestyle based on an understanding of being a part of sustainable development. All of this experience will be transferred to the family, as well as to the community. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to create ties with higher-education institutions that will prepare professional people who are trained in this philosophy and will apply it in their own work as educators.

Biographies

Ana María González Quirós works at Nuestra Señora de Lourdes School, where she has been teaching several different English courses. She holds degrees in English and teaching and has a master's degree from Universidad Nacional.

Ana Miranda is the English Department coordinator at Nuestra Señora de Lourdes School. She has 19 years' experience working with K-6 students in this institution. She graduated in English from the University of Costa Rica.

Grettel Víquez works at Nuestra Señora de Lourdes School as an English teacher. She graduated in English from the Universidad Nacional and is studying teaching at the same institution.


4.2.2. Gender Issues
Location: 25 University Avenue 162

Title
African women as leaders in higher education: a phenomenological study of gender, life, and career

Presenter
Ane Turner Johnson, PhD – Rowan University

Abstract

The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the career and life paths of African women higher-education administrators. Employing phenomenological qualitative methods in the form of conversational interviews and observation, this study explored participants' descriptions of life and career development. The research uncovered some of the key components of African women leaders in higher education, elucidating faith, family, and education as common constructs in their experiences. Finally, this research tells an important, but often untold, story of successful women on a continent plagued by a crisis narrative.

Biography

Ane Turner Johnson, PhD, is an assistant professor of educational leadership at Rowan University, in New Jersey. She has published on higher-education policy entrepreneurship in Africa and academic capitalism at public institutions in Kenya. Her research encompasses international higher-education policy, with a focus on Africa, and qualitative research methods.


Theme: Best Practices in Higher Education

Individual Presentations

4.3.1. Using Reflection as Teaching and Assessment
Location: Anderson 103

Title
West Chester University international social work classroom: findings from a collaboration with Friedensau University, Germany

Presenter
Rick Voss, DPC; David L. Bolton, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

This presentation reports on a June 2011 trip to Germany of a group of five West Chester University students who took a class at Friedensau University with social-work majors from around the world. The purpose of the trip was to learn about international social work, with an emphasis on German social work. While the class included didactic learning modules, the overall process focused on experiential learning, partnering WCU students with Friedensau students as "cooperative learning partners." Both groups of students were to learn together, not only by sitting in the classroom to receive instruction but also by visiting social-service institutions in Germany and working together to compare and contrast social-work approaches from around the globe. Students kept a reflective journal documenting their experiences. The presentation will describe the trip and present its educational benefits through an analysis of the journal entries.

Biographies

Richard W. Voss is a professor in the Department of Social Work at West Chester University, where he teaches courses in the human-behavior, social-policy, and race-relations curricular areas. His scholarly interests focus on cross-cultural social-work practice, veterans' issues, and social-capital development—specifically, grounding social-work theory in indigenous (Lakota-Sioux) philosophy and global perspectives. For summer 2011, Dr. Voss designed an immersion experience for his students in collaboration with Dr. David Bolton (West Chester University) and the graduate program in international social work at the Theologiche Hochschule, Friedensau University, Friedensau, Germany.

David L. Bolton is an associate professor in the Professional and Secondary Education Department at West Chester University. Dr. Bolton earned his PhD in research and measurement from Florida State University. His areas of research vary widely and include the effects of educational technology in the classroom and global educational issues. Dr. Bolton has presented at educational conferences in China, Poland, and Korea. Having spent six years in Germany in his youth and speaking fluent German, he has a particular interest in establishing relationships between the United States and Germany. Prior to visiting Friedensau last June, Dr. Bolton twice taught research and statistics at Friedensau University. At West Chester University, he has taught evaluation and measurement, educational technology courses and workshops, and research and statistics at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.


4.3.2. Knowledge Management 1
Location: Recitation 301

Title
The impact and influence of research on higher education

Presenter
Majid Bayani, Gisselle Herrera – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Theoretically, scholarly research directly influences higher-education pedagogy. In order to show the impact of predefined factors that can affect this relationship, this paper explores a statistical study. The results explain that the relationship between research and educational practices vary according to the factors involved. Although the intensity varies, the impact of scholarly research is direct and significant.

Biographies

Majid Bayani received his MS in computer science from UCR and his BS in electrical engineering from SUT. Since 2009, he has been an instructor and researcher at UNA. He has published many papers in the area of computer engineering (including IEEE) and participated as a member of the technical committee for international conferences. He is currently teaching computer architecture, networking, and communication at UNA.

Gisselle Herrera Morera received her MS and BS degrees in Spanish language, philology, and linguistics from the University of Costa Rica. She has joined UNA as an associate professor and researcher. She has participated in several national and international conferences, and her research on Hispanic linguistics has led to a number of publications, including a variety of papers and four books. Currently she is teaching the Hispanic subjects of Spanish, directing theses, and taking part in several research projects on the Spanish language in Central America.


Title
Research achievements, perspectives, and challenges in the College of Philosophy and Letters, Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica

Presenter
Aracelly Ugalde, Lucía Chacón – Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica

Abstrac - Complete Presentation (pdf)

t

In this project, we performed a quantitative and qualitative study to determine the role played by research projects from 2007 to 2011 in the College of Philosophy and Letters with the purpose of recognizing their characteristics, themes, geographic coverage, and results and findings and their importance in the humanities and in scientific communications. Moreover, as these projects reflect our identity and thought, we compare the methodology used in its implementation with international quality parameters. As a result of this study, we propose a prospective view of research in the college and its impact on the academic work of the university.

Biographies

Aracelly Ugalde, a Costa Rican librarian, holds a master's degree in information technology administration and has completed doctoral studies at the Universidad Complutense, Madrid. Currently, she is the vice-dean of the College of Philosophy and Letters at the Universidad Nacional (UNA), Costa Rica. She was the former sub-director and director of the Library Science, Documentation, and Information School. She has participated in several outreach and research projects and in international academic events, where she has presented numerous sessions. She has also participated as a specialist professor in Guatemala and Colombia.

Lucía Chacón holds a master's degree in information and library studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She was the sub-director and director of the Library Science, Documentation, and Information School at Universidad Nacional (UNA), Costa Rica. She was also the vice-dean and the dean of the College of Philosophy and Letters. She has led international academic events in digital library, humanist thinkers, and higher education. She has published about library automation, databases, documentation management, and digital information.


4.4.1. The Effect of Globalization upon Higher Education 2
Location: Anderson 111

Title
Effects of globalization on higher education with special reference to quality of life and wellbeing

Presenter
H. S. Tripathi, MS, MBA, PhD – Regional Director, NCTE, WRC, Bhopal

Abstract

Higher education gives opportunities for a good quality of life for individuals in particular and for the development of society in general. These opportunities across national borders have been opened through the globalization of various world economies. The market has forced schools and universities to exchange human resources across the various economies of the world, which now is becoming a village. Yet in spite of the opportunities it has created, globalization, with its emphasis on productivity and technology, has often come at the cost of personal and family happiness and wellbeing. The recent Great Recession has added the burden of joblessness for many educated people in developed and developing economies. We can conclude that schools and universities should not only focus on instilling knowledge and productivity but also focus on developing creativity and resourcefulness.

Biography

Dr. H. S. Tripathi has six years of teaching and research experience in botany and management and has served for 23 years in educational administration in universities and the government system.


Title
Sustainability of higher education in Africa in the knowledge-based economy: growing demand for participation and the myriad challenges

Presenter
Francis Atuahene – West Chester University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

While participation in higher education globally has increased exponentially over the past three decades, there is no other part of the world that has witnessed a more drastic enrollment surge than sub-Saharan Africa. Yet, the region records the lowest Gross Enrollment Ratio (GER)—5.6% compared to 26% for East Asia and the Pacific, 34% for Latin America and the Caribbean, 11% for South and West Asia, and 62% for Central and Eastern Europe (UNESCO-UIS, 2009). Using institutional and national data, this presentation will descriptively chronicle the history and current transformation of higher education in Africa in the context of resource sustainability and the challenges posed by the global knowledge economy.

Biography

Dr. Francis Atuahene is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Development at West Chester University. His research interests include higher-education finance policy, international comparative higher education, contemporary issues in international higher education, retention, and accessibility and affordability of higher education for students from disadvantaged backgrounds and of lower socioeconomic status.


Session 5 (Thursday: 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM)


Theme: Technology

Full Session

5.1.1. Using Technology to Bridge Boundaries: Potentials of a Geographic Information System (GIS)
Location: Merion 112

Presenter
Gary Coutu, PhD; Kristen Crossney, PhD; Dorothy Ives-Dewey PhD, AICP; Matin Katirai, PhD; Esteban Romero, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has become a widely used set of tools employed over a broad range of academic disciplines for research and teaching. Built on geodatabases and used for mapping and spatial analysis, GIS has potential for a wide range of applications in the social sciences, the physical sciences, and the humanities. GIS has the potential to bridge alliances among a variety of university functions, including scholarship, teaching, and community outreach. This session will present information on the development, evolution, and current state of the art of the GIS system in the College of Business and Public Affairs at West Chester University.

Biographies

Dr. Gary Coutu is an associate professor in geography and planning at West Chester University, with a concentration in geographic information systems (GIS). Dr. Coutu has over 20 years' experience in GIS consulting and teaching in higher education and on national development projects. He has extensive experience with technology in K-12 and community education programs.

Dr. Kristen B. Crossney is an assistant professor of geography and planning at West Chester University. Dr. Crossney's research encompasses many facets of housing and urban development, including spatial patterns of mortgage lending and housing opportunity. Her work utilizes spatial and statistical methods and often incorporates GIS for modeling and visualization.

Dr. Dottie Ives-Dewey is an associate professor and chair of the Geography and Planning Department at West Chester University. Dr. Ives-Dewey's research interests are in the areas of land-use planning and regulation. Based on her experience in the classroom, she has also published academic research that explores the use of GIS as a tool for community-based experiential education.

Dr. Matin Katirai joined the Department of Geography and Planning at West Chester University in fall of 2009. Dr. Katirai received his PhD in urban and public affairs from the University of Louisville in 2009. He has published research in the areas of emergency response and health care and has a forthcoming piece on the federal stimulus. Dr. Katirai has done work in various fields, including business, education, health care. and government.

Dr. Esteban Romero is the GIS lab manager of the Center for Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis of West Chester University. He is a sociologist and geographer with extensive experience in research and education. He assists students and faculty, providing resources and the adequate environment to facilitate GIS projects.


Theme: Sustainability

Individual Presentations

5.2.1. Social Issues in Hispanic Cultures
Location: 25 University Avenue 162

Title
The work of the Youth in Action Project in high-risk areas to improve the wellbeing of young people: an experience with groups of women in the Guararí community of Heredia

Presenter
Karol Monge, Marcela Gutiérrez - Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract

In recent decades, Costa Rican society has faced many changes that have had a direct bearing on sustainable social progress. In spite of efforts to improve national economic indicators, significant disparities persist among social groups. One demographic that is especially affected is individuals between 12 and 35 years of age. In this population, the inequalities are associated with unemployment and limited opportunities for advancement. Health, education, and economic wellbeing are interconnected and are crucial to the lives of young people. Capacity building (human, social, political, and economic) is important for youngsters in at-risk communities. It will help them improve their quality of life and will cultivate valuable social capital.

Biographies

Karol Monge is an undergraduate student majoring in planning in the Universidad Nacional School of Economic and Social Planning. With experience in university outreach projects on social issues, Karol Monge is currently an assistant in the projects "Comprehensive Training for Young People" and "Intergenerational Education for the Prevention of Breast and Cervical Cancer in Women in the Greater Metropolitan Area," which are funded by the National Council of Rectors.

Marcela Gutiérrez, who is a surgeon from the Universidad Iberoamericana, Costa Rica, has experience in the fields of public health, health and the environment, and health in at-risk populations. She was a consultant to the International Center for Economic Policy at the Universidad Nacional (UNA). Her work has focused on methodologies and practical exercises for decision-making in the field of public health and the development and implementation of UNA programs to promote health and improve the quality of life for students and seniors. Currently she is on the faculty of UNA's Center for General Studies and is the coordinator of the projects "Comprehensive Training for Young People" and "Intergenerational Education for the Prevention of Breast and Cervical Cancer in Women in the Greater Metropolitan Area," which are funded by the National Council of Rectors.


Title
The work of the School of Library Sciences of Universidad Nacional (UNA) with the indigenous people of Costa Rica and the collaboration with West Chester University (WCU) to explore further their needs to preserve their culture

Presenter
Florybeth Sanchez – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica
Ana Sanchez – West Chester University

Abstract

The UNA School of Library Sciences initiated its work with the Costa Rican indigenous communities by establishing an Information Center for the Central American Indigenous Groups. This project faced many challenges, including lack of documentation to access information about the culture and traditions of these groups. Therefore, the project was redefined, and in 2009 a new project was started under the leadership of Professor Florybeth Sanchez. The new project aimed at strengthening the integral development of the Boruca, Rey Curré, and Térraba indigenous groups. This project ran from 2009 to 2011. Among its many achievements was the creation of two community libraries, one in the Terraba reservation and another one in the Boruca indigenous reservation. In January 2012, Professors Florybeth Sanchez, from UNA, and Ana Sanchez, from WCU, made the decision to become partners and to collaborate to continue helping the indigenous reservations in Costa Rica. The primary goal of the new phase of the project will be to eliminate the apparent and systemic marginalization of the Costa Rican indigenous people, who are living in extreme poverty and are in danger of cultural (including linguistic) extinction. The first step in this collaborative project is to collect pilot data for a comprehensive feasibility study on sustained educational and cultural enhancement and preservation.

Biographies

(Unavailable)


Title
A new approach to Haitian-Dominican relations: the assumption of Hispaniola Island's biculturalism

Presenter
Joseph Pierre, MA – Unibe, Dominican Republic

Abstract

Haitian-Dominican relations have been based upon the ideology that the Dominican Republic sees itself as Catholic and white, while considering Haiti as Voodoo and black. Beyond academic research to improve these relations, the 2010 earthquake can be perceived as a "myth buster." A door has been opened for new bilateral relations on the island. As most problems between the countries are cultural, a new approach to Haitian-Dominican relations should consider working through sustainable alternatives including education, environment, music, and religion, an approach that would render great profits for both nations.

Biography

Joseph Pierre, an economist and political analyst, is a professor of political science at Unibe, Dominican Republic. He has worked as an economic investigator at the Ministry of Finance of the Dominican Republic since 2009 and was a professor of history and sociology at Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra, Santo Domingo.


Full Session

5.2.2. Higher Education for Sustainability: Challenges & Strategies
Location: Merion 113

Presenter
Paul Morgan – West Chester University

Abstract

Sustainability is rapidly moving from the margins of higher education to the center of interest and concern. While universities have largely embraced efforts to green their operations and curricula, challenges and questions remain. What is the nature and extent of our planetary predicament? Is it a normal challenge that can be addressed using familiar tools and strategies, or is it a "game changer" that calls into question fundamental cultural assumptions and institutions, including the nature and mission of higher education itself? How can higher education programs move beyond "less unsustainability" and help catalyze real social and cultural transformation? Answers to these questions yield not only a much needed perspective but should also inform our understanding of strategies and priorities. This session is intended to help all members of the university community understand the nature of sustainability, grapple with its challenges, and learn strategies for creating effective sustainability initiatives. It will explore practical ways to move beyond the relatively comfortable work of "less unsustainability" to the difficult, unprecedented, creative work of making a sustainable future possible.

Biography

Paul Morgan is an associate professor at West Chester University and is currently the University's sustainability coordinator and director of WCU's certificate programs in education for sustainability.


Theme: Best Practices in Higher Education

Individual Presentations

5.3.1. Increasing Math Achievement
Location: Anderson 120

Title
Relationship between the academic achievement of students in mathematics and access to higher education at the Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Presenter
Yasemin Derelioğlu, Dilek Çağırgan Gülten, İlker Soytürk – Istanbul University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

In contemporary teacher-training programs, math literacy is especially important due to the changes in today's life conditions and qualifications expected from individuals. Mathematical problem solving is a complex activity involving multiple processes. The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of computer use in mathematics on preservice teachers' beliefs about their math literacy and mathematical problem-solving skills. The research consisted of 152 elementary mathematics preservice teachers attending a university in Istanbul, Turkey. The results indicate that both math literacy self-efficacy beliefs and mathematical problem-solving beliefs are related to the use of computers in studying math.

Biography

Yasemin Derelioğlu received her PhD from Marmara University (Istanbul) Educational Sciences Institute in 2004. Her thesis title was The Examination of the Relationship between University Students' Critical Thinking Disposition and Locus of Control. She is an assistant professor at Istanbul University Hasan Ali Yucel Faculty of Education.


5.3.2. Study Abroad Programs
Location: Brandywine 31

Title
Vital essentials to know before you lead or sign off on a study-abroad course

Presenter
T.H. Baughman – University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Abstract

The clamor for globalization heard at colleges and universities across the country often focuses on the single most effective way of creating a change in students in favor of thinking globally: the study-abroad program. This paper describes the pitfalls encountered and key elements in the planning and execution of short-term study-abroad courses. Having an academic expertise that lends itself to such a program does not mean that an instructor has the very different and specialized skills involved in leading such classes. This presentation will provide an overview of the topics that must be considered, from the earliest thoughts about offering a study tour to the successful completion of one. Faculty members will gain practical, useful, and potentially life-saving advice on how to make the most of such an experience for students. Administrators who have to sign off on such proposals are often flying blind, assuming that the instructor has the skills to carry out such a plan and hoping that all will be well. This presentation will afford administrators key items to monitor to ensure a safe and academically sound study course.

Biography

T.H. Baughman has spent more than 1,300 days escorting people around the world in an academic environment, including designing and leading 25 for-credit study-abroad classes.


Title
Developing sustainable international collaborations through technology: online educational partnerships

Presenter
Deirdre Pettipiece – West Chester University

Abstract

Efforts to internationalize institutions of higher learning and develop global partnerships to enrich and diversify campus life and student experience have become widespread in United States universities. Over the past twenty years or so, most institutions of higher learning have emphasized the need to infuse global themes into curricula, mission statements, and learning outcomes, while also encouraging increased participation in international study abroad experiences and other initiatives. The visibility and discussion of globalization and study abroad have also increased in American K-12 education, and the desire to participate in international experiences among incoming college students is evident in the NSSE statistics that indicate the majority of first-year students in America expect to study abroad. Sadly, fourth-year student data indicate that the overwhelmingly majority don't go. Other data from NSSE and similar large scale surveys indicate a similar level of expectation as regards on-campus engagement with students and faculty from other countries and cultures. Once again, these expectations are often not met since increasing international student and faculty presence on American campuses is a difficult and competitive undertaking.
While many institutions report sporadic successes with both international study-abroad experiences and international student enrollment, long-term growth in these areas is often stifled as a result of fluctuating institutional commitment. Due to the downturn in the global economy, international study-abroad experiences and international student enrollment are both in a downward trend, and the uncertain economic future seems to indicate that this trend will continue. The fact remains, however, that international experiences and international student and faculty presence are crucial to the success of college students who face a future in what has become a global professional audience and marketplace. It has never been more important than now for institutions to commit to international initiatives. In order to engage in them in successful, sustainable ways, institutions of higher learning must recognize the value of new technologies and use them strategically to initiate and maintain research and curricular collaborations, student and faculty exchanges, internships, and cultural events. This paper articulates strategic ways that educational institutions can successfully realize their international initiatives and maintain them through the use of technologies, many of which are available for little or no cost.

Biography

Deirdre Pettipiece is the associate dean for faculty development and external affairs in the College of Arts and Sciences, West Chester University of Pennsylvania.


Full Sessions

5.3.3. Service Learning in Higher Education
Location: Anderson 103

Title
Best practices in service learning at West Chester University: bringing service learning from the margins to the center of campus-community life

Presenter
Hannah Ashley, Eleanor Brown, Linda Stevenson – West Chester University

Abstract

"Service learning" education is an increasingly well-defined and utilized form of pedagogy, one that creates opportunities for campus and communities to mutually benefit from a connection of applied, experiential learning. At WCU, courses utilizing service-learning methods have grown and diversified over time. This panel highlights service-learning best practices at WCU, specifically citing examples from English, psychology, and political science. The projects include students teaching/mentoring in writing programs for local youth, conducting child-development research with local Head Start programs, and tutoring local Latino/a youth whose families have recently migrated to the U.S. WCU's Office of Service Learning and Volunteer Programs has earned national recognition in this area of community and civic engagement, which is a boon not only to the institution but also to WCU's service region.

Biographies

Hannah Ashley is an associate professor of English at West Chester University. Her publications include "The Idea of a Literacy Dula" (forthcoming in Unsustainable: Owning Our Best, Short-Lived Efforts at Community Work) and "Between Civility and Conflict: Toward a Community Engaged Procedural Rhetoric." She is co-developing a WCU minor in youth, urban studies, and power and directs Writing Zones 12.5, a college-access writing-center program.

Eleanor Brown is an associate professor of psychology at West Chester University and directs the Early Childhood Cognition and Emotions Lab (ECCEL). Through partnerships with Head Start preschools, she teaches undergraduate students about psychology and social justice. Her research on children in poverty appears in acclaimed books and scholarly journals.

Linda Stevenson is an associate professor of political science and the director of Latin American Studies at WCU. She teaches Latin American and Latino politics courses, using service learning with local Latinos as a part of the coursework. Her research focuses on the impact of democratization and globalization on gender equity and women's rights in Mexico and Chile and for Latino/a migrant workers in the United States.


5.3.4. Mindfulness and Self-compassion in Health-Care Education
Location: Recitation 301

Presenter
Donald McCown, Christine Williams, Christine Moriconi – West Chester University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

In meeting the ever-changing and complex health-care needs of patients, clinicians are at risk for compassion fatigue and burnout. By adding mindfulness training, with its reciprocal development of self-compassion, clinicians may be protected from risk, while patients receive higher quality care and have better outcomes. Methods to adapt curricula to include mindfulness training for students across the allied health professions will be explored, and sample course designs will be shared. To deepen understanding, attendees will be invited to take an active role in cultivating compassion and equanimity towards themselves through experiential mindfulness and self-compassion exercises.

Biographies

Donald McCown is an assistant professor of health at West Chester University. The principal author of Teaching Mindfulness: A Practical Guide for Clinicians and Educators and New World Mindfulness: From the Founding Fathers, Emerson, and Thoreau to Your Personal Practice, he regularly presents on the history, ethics, and pedagogy of mindfulness.

Christine Williams is an assistant professor at WCU in the Department of Health. She earned her PhD from Middle Tennessee State University and is a Certified Health Education Specialist. Her current research includes stress and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), and she recently completed the MBSR practicum.

Christine Moriconi is an assistant professor of nursing at West Chester University. She holds a doctorate in clinical psychology from La Salle University and has a private clinical practice specializing in family therapy and mindfulness. She was trained in mindfulness at the Center for Mindfulness and Thomas Jefferson University.


Individual Presentations

5.4.1. Teaching Global Higher Education 2
Location: Anderson 111

Title
Emerging models for international higher education and collaborative learning

Presenter
Darrell Norman Burrell – George Mason University
Andrea Todd – Virginia Tech

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

As universities develop hybrid-program degree programs with periodic residencies, they have the ability to use team-orientated service learning, action learning, and action research projects geared towards the development of collaborative community-oriented solutions to the most complex problems. This presentation explores the power and ability of these collaborative learning opportunities, especially when the students come from all over the world.

Biographies

Andrea Todd is associate director of Virginia Tech's Language and Culture Institute. Previously she served as director of graduate affairs at National Defense University. Dr. Todd holds a doctorate in education from George Washington University, an MA in linguistics from George Mason University, and a BS in Spanish from Georgetown University.

Darrell Norman Burrell is a post-doctoral graduate student. He is a former Presidential Management Fellow and is a faculty member at George Mason University. He also teaches in the Doctor of Health Sciences Program at A.T. Still University. He teaches in the online "green" MBA in sustainability development at Marylhurst University. He received a doctoral degree in health education in environmental public health from A.T. Still University. He has an EdS (post-master's terminal degree) in higher-education administration from the George Washington University, two graduate degrees in human-resources management and management from National Louis University, and a graduate degree in sales and marketing management from Prescott College.


Title
Transformational approaches to knowledge sharing: the case of the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA) Business School

Presenter
Franklyn A. Manu – Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA) Business School
Leyland M. Lucas – Morgan State University
Stephen O. Agyei-Mensah – Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

This paper examines a unique approach to knowledge sharing and program development. In the last decade, the economy of Ghana has been experiencing tremendous expansion. For example, Dzawu and Dontoh (2011) report that the second quarter of 2011 saw a growth of a whopping 34%, exceeding the government forecast of 31%. The related increase in business activities has generated locally owned enterprises, many with international partners. Further, multinational and transnational corporations have expanded their business operations or established new ventures in Ghana. The advent of technology has also opened up the whole world as a market to any enterprise that wishes to compete in the global village. These phenomena have called for workers with a global outlook. The majority of Ghanaian students cannot afford to travel out of the country to acquire education with a global perspective. One Ghanaian institution, GIMPA, has responded to the challenge in an innovative way. Much of the effort in this area has focused on finding ways to improve the educational experiences of students, such that they can expand their knowledge base and understanding of the global environment. Specifically, it is argued that incorporating experiential learning exercises and international experiences enhances the quality of educational experiences for graduate students. Here we look at a distinctive approach adopted by an institution in a developing country to enhance the global educational experiences of its graduate students, particularly given their historical exposure to rote learning.

Biographies

Dr. Franklyn A. Manu is currently a professor of marketing and international business and the dean of the GIMPA Business School. Previously, he was a professor of marketing and international business at Morgan State University, in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. Before moving to Morgan, he was an assistant professor of marketing at Loyola University of Maryland. Dr. Manu holds a BSc in administration (marketing option) from the University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana. He also has an MBA and a PhD in marketing from New York University. He has published papers in many peer-reviewed publications. His research interests are in the areas of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and marketing strategy.

Dr. Leyland M. Lucas is an associate professor of management and director of the PhD program in business administration at Morgan State University. He is also a visiting associate professor at the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA), where he lectures in strategic management and organizational development. Dr. Lucas received his PhD in organization management from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. He has published papers in several journals including Corporate Reputation Review, Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, Journal of Knowledge Management, The Learning Organization Journal, and several other peer-reviewed publications. His primary research interests are in the areas of organizational learning, knowledge transfer, minority entrepreneurship, and reputational effects on performance. He has also conducted research in Ghana and Guyana.

Dr. Stephen O. Agyei-Mensah is an associate professor in the Computer Information Science Department of Clarion University of Pennsylvania. He is also a visiting associate professor in management information systems at GIMPA. Before coming to Clarion, he was the chief information officer for Verizon Micronesia/Pacific, overseeing information technology (IT) operations for Verizon International on the Pacific islands of Saipan, Rota, Tinian, and Guam in Micronesia. Prior to that, he was a research associate at the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technical Education, in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Dr. Agyei-Mensah holds a BSc in administration (accounting option) from the University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana; MBA (emphasis in management accounting and operations management) from the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; MS in applied computer science from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore; and EdD in occupational and adult education (computer applications in business) from the Oklahoma State University. In addition, Dr. Agyei-Mensah holds several professional certifications in IT. He has published papers in peer-reviewed publications. His research interests include pushing the frontiers of IT and bringing his experimentations to the classroom. He also has a passion for leveraging IT in the delivery of instruction and global education.


Individual Presentations

5.4.2. Public Higher Education in Costa Rica 1
Location: Brandywine 04

Title
The public university in Costa Rica in the context of Latin America: the case of the Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Chorotega Branch, facing new challenges

Presenter
Orlando de la O and Víctor Baltodano – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract

This paper analyzes the current state of public higher education in Latin America, with special focus on Costa Rica. The first section characterizes the major trends that are occurring in higher education in the new context of globalization. Globalization's impact on higher education ranges from education's status as a commodity to the so-called knowledge society and its impact on Latin America. The second section sets out the general characteristics of public higher education in Costa Rica and addresses the example of the transformation in academic administration and management at the Chorotega Branch of the Universidad Nacional of Costa Rica.

Biographies

Víctor Baltodano is a professor at Universidad Nacional (UNA), Costa Rica, where he is an economist and doctoral student in the social sciences. Professor Baltodano has been the director of the Chorotega Regional Office of Universidad Nacional (1995-1997) and academic director of UNA's Nicoya Campus (2008-2010). He has over 25 publications in national and international journals. His research interests include culture, economics, tourism, and higher education.

Orlando de la O holds a master's degree in education and is currently the dean of the Chorotega Regional Office of Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. He has spoken at conferences and seminars throughout Latin America. In addition, he is the author of several books on poetry, culture, and education and has published a number of articles in national and international journals.


Title
Challenges of higher education in the 21st century

Presenter
Leiner Vargas – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

This paper deals with the challenges facing the Costa Rican public universities in the 21st century. Universities are a social institution that transformed Costa Rican society in the 20th century; higher education was also the cause of great social, cultural, and economic achievements that give support to contemporary Costa Rica. The quality and social commitment of a university should be priorities held outside of the issues and interests of individual agents or ideological groups, both inside and outside the university. We now must regard the university as our society. Therefore, the crises in our universities should be regarded as greater than financial, bureaucratic, and ideological concerns. What is lacking is a comprehensive national project in support of higher education.

Biography

Leiner Vargas holds a PhD in economics, with specialization in the economics of technological and institutional change, from the University of Aalborg, Denmark. His master's degree in economics is from the Autonomous Technological Institute of Mexico. Dr. Vargas has extensive experience in the areas of institutional economics, energy, and the environment. He has been the academic director of El Centro Internacional de Política Económica para el Desarrollo Sostenible (CINPE) at Universidad Nacional (UNA), Costa Rica, and has served as UNA's vice president of development.


Session 6 (Thursday: 3:00 PM – 4:15 PM)


Theme: Technology

Individual Presentations

6.1.1. Using Technologies to Teach
Location: Merion 112

Title
Technology and new language trends: the role of the ESL teacher

Presenter
Jacqueline Araya, Beatriz Gamboa – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Technology is omnipresent. It is an important source of both entertainment and communication. The stylistic rules of communication for the various media available today differ from traditional forms and standards, especially among young people. This communication (identified as Computer Mediated Communication) takes place in different formats. What are the implications of these new trends in language? What is the role of language teachers in the face of the linguistic mutations? This paper aims to answer these questions from the perspective of sociolinguistics and based on the results of a field study.

Biographies

Jacqueline Araya holds a master's degree in English-Spanish translation from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. She also completed her BA in literature and linguistics and the licentiate program in Spanish-English translation at Universidad Nacional. For the past 13 years, she has been an English professor at Universidad Nacional's Perez Zeledon Campus.

Beatriz Gamboa holds a master's degree in educational administration from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. She also completed her BA in English teaching and the licentiate program in pedagogy at Universidad Nacional. For the past eight years, she has been an English professor at Universidad Nacional's Perez Zeledon Campus.


Title
Teacher education the ICT way

Presenter
Roopak Chauhan – American India Foundation Trust

Abstract

The focus of the paper is on how to make school students become consumers of technology as well as change agents in using technology to impact the world. This process will be highlighted through the Adobe Youth Voices project, with which the author has been associated over the past six years. The program is a global philanthropic initiative that empowers youth from public schools to comment on their world using multimedia and digital tools. The idea behind this initiative is for the youth to communicate and share their ideas, demonstrate their potential, and take action in their communities. Youth from various countries have been engaged in Adobe Youth Voices programs to develop original, thought-provoking content on domestic violence, environmental degradation, the impact of war, and other topics. The program seeks to target change in self and communities through the youth commenting on their world with the help of ICT. Some examples of wider media tools include documentaries, photo essays, and animations. ICT as a means of reflection on the self and community and various related issues will be explored through specific examples of documentaries made by the children under the guidance of their educators. Included will be a case study of a documentary on "Save the Paper'' that was followed by a paper-saving intervention program in the school. The session will also expound upon the use of ICT as a means to link the school and the community as advocated in various policy documents.

Biography

Roopak Chauhan has more than 12 years' experience at various levels in not-for-profit organizations, educational institutions, performing arts groups, and the corporate sector. An electronics and telecommunication engineer by education, Roopak's work experience includes ICT training, multimedia training, children's theatre, website development, print advertising, event management, and more. During the last seven years, he has been actively involved with ICT in schools through working with educators and students in India, conducting workshops for students on visual and performing arts, and designing websites. He is currently working with the American India Foundation as program manager and manages 50 Adobe Youth Voices schools in four states of India. A self-taught media trainer and Adobe software enthusiast, his areas of interest include using digital technologies, theatre and art as media of expression, and lifelong learning for youth and educators.


Theme: Sustainability

Individual Presentations

6.2.1. Teaching Sustainability in Higher Education
Location: Merion 113

Title
Comparative forest ecology education for secondary-school students

Presenter
Greg Turner – West Chester University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

The use of comparative teaching in the study of ecology allows natural-science teachers to better educate their students about global biomes by highlighting their differences, similarities, and connectedness. Understanding differences in national standards and pedagogical approaches used to teach ecology can also improve ecology-teacher pedagogy skills. In this presentation, exemplary standards, teaching approaches, and institutional programs from the U.S. and other countries used to teach forest ecology will be compared to clarify key best teaching practices and the need for comparative teaching research as they relate to this key ecology topic.

Biography

Greg Turner, from West Chester University, is a mycorrhizal ecologist who has conducted research primarily in New York's Catskill and Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains. He has visited forests from Portugal to Peru and hopes to branch out of North America to pursue research opportunities in Latin America and elsewhere.


Theme: Best Practices in Higher Education

Individual Presentations

6.3.1. Relationships between Higher Education and Community
Location: Anderson 120

Title
CI-UNA: empowering the local community to face 21st century challenges

Presenter
Yalile Jiménez, Cinthya Olivares, Sandra Palacios – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Universidad Nacional is one of the five state universities of Costa Rica. This university promotes partnership with business and the local community through the establishment of projects that involve citizens' continuing education. Centro de Idiomas-Universidad Nacional (CI-UNA) is an outreach project that offers formal education in foreign languages to citizens from the southern region of Costa Rica. This project was designed to advance the linguistic abilities of the local population through the implementation of an integral and competitive foreign-language program.

Biographies

Sandra Palacios holds a licentiate´s degree in applied linguistic in English from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica, and a master´s degree in linguistics from Ball State University, U.S.A. She has taught for ten years at the high-school level and six years with university students. She has also participated in national and international conferences for teachers of English and been a trainer for several courses in the CONARE-MEP program.

Yalile Jiménez holds a licentiate´s degree in applied linguistic in English and a master´s degree in second language and culture with an emphasis in English from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. She has worked for ten years teaching beginning, intermediate, and advanced students at Universidad Nacional. She is currently working at Universidad Nacional, Brunca Extension, in the English teaching major and CONARE-MEP training courses.

Cinthya Olivares Garita holds a licentiate's degree in applied linguistics in English and a master's degree in second languages and culture with emphasis in English from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. She is currently teaching at Universidad Nacional, Brunca Extension, in the English Department. She has worked for 12 years teaching students of all levels: primary, secondary, and university. She is a developer of the project CI-UNA (Centro de Idiomas, Universidad Nacional). She has also taught courses at other private and public institutions, participated in national conferences for teachers of English, and been a trainer for several courses for in-service MEP teachers.


Title
Fulfilling English teaching practicum requirements through informal adult-education outreach project at Universidad Nacional, Campus Nicoya

Presenter
Yendry Dover – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

The outreach project Improving the Competitive Skills of Grassroots Entrepreneurs through English Language Training in the Gulf of Nicoya, Guanacaste, Costa Rica was initiated in 2008 by professors at the Universidad Nacional, Nicoya. The project includes the use of informal teaching to fulfill the practicum for student teachers majoring in secondary EFL teaching. The participants provided adult women in underprivileged rural areas with necessary language skills. As a result, the adult learners and student teachers mutually benefited. An analysis of the process undertaken by the participants is described, and the results are outlined and discussed.

Biography

Yendry Dover is an English and outreach professor at Universidad Nacional, Nicoya Campus, Costa Rica. She holds bachelor's and master's degrees in English teaching from Universidad Nacional.


Title
Development of skills in the young person: components of healthy lifestyles

Presenter
Marcela Gutiérrez – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract

This initiative aims to influence the lifestyle of young people and promote improvement in their quality of life. Accion Joven is an excellent opportunity for individuals in at-risk communities to expand their political, social, and economic opportunities and capacities. Through training in four areas—sexuality, healthy lifestyles, democratic practices, and entrepreneurship—a culture of environmental responsibility, freedom, and respect is promoted. The paper is a systematic review of the work conducted by the School of Public Health of the Universidad de Costa Rica. This initiative is expected to generate an academic analysis that allows content and methodological innovations to improve the skills and knowledge of the participating young people.

Biography

Marcela Gutiérrez, a surgeon from the Universidad Iberoamericana, Costa Rica, has experience in the fields of public health, health and the environment, and health in at-risk populations. She was a consultant to the International Center for Economic Policy at the Universidad Nacional (UNA). Her work has focused on methodologies and practical exercises for decision-making in the field of public health and the development and implementation of UNA programs to promote health and improve the quality of life for students and seniors. Currently she is on the faculty of UNA's Center for General Studies and is the coordinator of the projects "Comprehensive Training for Young People" and "Intergenerational Education for the Prevention of Breast and Cervical Cancer in Women in the Greater Metropolitan Area," which are funded by the National Council of Rectors.


6.3.2. Public Service
Location: Recitation 301

Title
Cooperation based on the Triple Helix Model in the example of the Bialystok metropolis

Presenter
Tadeusz Truskolaski, PhD, Prof. University of Bialystok, Mayor of the City of Bialystok, Poland

Abstract

The "triple helix" of government, science, and business cooperation is necessary. In this process, leaders play the key role through mobilizing and supporting the network of relationships among local enterprises as well as their relationships with the research and scientific infrastructure. There are a number of barriers preventing freedom in business-science-administration cooperation. There are no clear system solutions in the current legal transactions, a situation that leads to uncoordinated and ineffective cooperation among the parties—the partners in the "triple helix" of relationships. The problem is also in interdisciplinary communication about the possibilities of mutual cooperation. In most of the cases, partners do not know how to reach each other and on which principles to establish cooperation. I will present examples of a governmental body's activity—the City of Bialystok represented by me. Bialystok is an initiator and accelerator of activities within many cooperative fields, striving to minimize the above-mentioned problems.

Biography

Tadeusz Truskolaski, PhD in economic sciences, is the mayor of the city of Białystok, Poland, a position he has held since December 2006. He is also a professor at the University of Białystok and the author of more than 80 scientific publications. Dr. Truskolaski is a former advisor to the Polish Minister of Regional Development and worked in the Government Center for Strategic Studies on national development strategy and on the operational program development of eastern Poland. In the years 2001-2003, Dr. Truskolaski became the head of the Regional Policy Department in the Marshal's Office of the Podlaskie Region, where he contributed successfully to the implementation of the PHARE Program. The professional team he created was able to gain substantial European Union funding for the benefit of the Białystok and Podlaskie Regions.


Full Session

6.3.3. Teaching and Learning in a Global World
Location: Anderson 103

Presenter
Marilyn Dono-Koulouris, EdD

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Throughout history, the way students have been educated has gone from the traditional lecture style to experiential learning offering students alternative ways of mastering the subject matter. Educating in a global world presents special, dynamic challenges; therefore, educators must look at teaching and learning in a different context. Utilization of a student's learning style, academic service learning, and experiential learning are means by which to accomplish this goal. This workshop will demonstrate how, through experiential learning while traveling abroad and at home, students realized a greater understanding of the global world.

Biography

Marilyn Dono-Koulouris's background has been in banking, corporate finance, and education, with education spanning more than a 20-year period including positions as an administrator, chairperson, teacher, and professor. She holds an MBA in finance and an EdD in instructional leadership. Her research areas include learning styles, experiential learning, and leadership style.


Theme: Globalization and Transnationalization in Higher Education

Individual Presentations

6.4.1. Promoting Access to Quality Pedagogy
Location: Brandywine 04

Title
Pedagogical and technical skills of university faculty

Presenter
Deyanira Castellón R., Carlos Clavijo Arboleda – Universidad Virtual, Tecnológico de Monterrey, México

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

As established by UNESCO, competency-based education has become essential in promoting lifelong learning and building the right skills to contribute to the cultural, social, and economic development of society. This research, which was carried out in four higher-education institutions in Colombia and Mexico, identified as a common denominator that university teachers do not yet have the necessary expertise and 21st -century pedagogical skills to prepare students to face the constant challenges of globalization, to be productive, and to participate in a creative and innovative way in the solution of social problems.

Biography

Deyanira Castellón is an industrial mechanical engineer from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras and holds a graduate specialization in steel processes, a major in education for youth and adult education, and a master's degree in higher-education administration. Deyanira Castellón works as a teacher at the Instituto de Estudios Superiores de México and since 2005 has served as academic director.

Carlos Clavijo Arboleda's academic field is business administration with a focus in the areas of finance and design and project evaluation. He holds degrees in social economics and education. He is on the faculty of the Universidad Virtual, Tecnológico de Monterrey, México.


Full Session

6.4.2. Schooling the World: The White Man's Last Burden
Location: Anderson 111

Presenter
David L. Bolton, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract

This video discusses the impact of Western education on traditional indigenous societies. It focuses on the Lādakh people of India. The recording features commentary by Wade Davis, Helena Norberg-Hodge, Vandana Shiva, Manish Jain, and Dolma Tsering.

Biography

Dr. David L. Bolton received his PhD in research and testing from Florida State University and his MS in research and statistical methodology from Andrews University. Dr. Bolton's primary area of research is assessing attitudes toward and use of educational technology in education.


Session 7 (Friday: 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM)

 

Theme: Technology

Full Session

7.1.1. Classrooms with Broad Horizons and without Walls
Location: Merion 112

Presenter
Padmini Murthy, MD, MPH

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

The use of social media and technology has given a power tool for educators in reaching out to students beyond the classroom. As members of academia, we have expanded our horizons far beyond the traditional educational settings. I have used Skype as a medium to invite guest lecturers from around the world to talk to my medical and public-health students, who have benefitted enormously from this interaction. We have also used social media such as Facebook and created a wish list on Amazon.com to raise funds for an international health project in Malawi. The concept of classrooms with broad horizons has also facilitated more interaction between members of academia globally.

Biography

Padmini (Mini) Murthy is a physician and an activist. She has been working in the health sector in various capacities for 25 years. She holds an MPH and an MS in management from New York University. Dr. Murthy has received several awards and has presented in numerous national and international conferences. Her book Women's Global Health and Human Rights has been well received worldwide. She is the Medical Women's International Association co-representative to the United Nations.


Theme: Sustainability

Individual Presentations

7.2.1. Teaching Sustainability: Rivers and River Basins
Location: Merion 113

Title
Working with students in geoscience education: the Christina Basin Critical Zone Observatory

Presenter
Gary Coutu, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract

An NSF-funded project used information from the Christina Basin Critical Zone Observatory (CBCZO) to develop and test a curriculum introducing teachers and educationally at-risk youth to the principles and processes we experience on the Earth's surface. The majority of participants in this program were seventh- and eighth-grade children of migrant workers in the local mushroom industry (a large Mexican population). CBCZO materials/data were integrated into a course to build sensors and integrate data into a geographic information system for watershed mapping and analysis. Partners include the Stroud Water Research Center, Kennett Consolidated School District, and West Chester University of Pennsylvania.

Biography

Gary Coutu, PhD, is an associate professor in geography and planning at West Chester University, with a concentration in geographic information systems (GIS). Dr. Coutu has over 20 years' experience in GIS consulting and teaching in higher education and on national development projects. He has extensive experience with technology in K-12 and community education programs.


Title
Reorienting teacher education towards sustainability

Presenter
Dr. Kalyani Akalamkam – Lady Shri Ram Collage for Women, Delhi University, New Delhi, India

Abstract

Education for a sustainable future is the main agenda of the Decade for Sustainable Development (DESD, 2005-2014). Education for sustainability requires an in-depth understanding of the interdependence and interconnectedness of human beings and the environment, and the discourse needs to be deeply rooted in a socio-cultural ethos. These goals call for a curriculum and discourse that are indigenous, multidisciplinary, and experiential. In this context, teacher-education programs play a potential role. This paper presents one such intervention during the preservice teacher-education program to integrate the concepts of sustainability into teacher preparation. This preservice program is a four-year graduate degree in elementary education at the University of Delhi. In India, following the directives of the Supreme Court (2003), environmental education has been made a compulsory subject in the school curriculum. However, data gathered from in-service teachers as a part of this study reveal that teachers are inadequately prepared in terms of both content and pedagogy and that neither in-service nor preservice programs are addressing it. The present study also revealed misconceptions held by preservice teachers on many environmental-education topics and a lack of understanding of local issues such as the pollution of the Yamuna River, disaster management (Delhi being in a highly seismic zone), the construction of high-rise buildings in the river bed and its ecological impact, and climate change. Unfortunately the formal curriculum of the teacher-education program does not address these issues. This study reports the impact of interventional strategies such as portfolios, fieldtrips, a short-term-module course, and a special lecture series by eminent resource persons. The pedagogy adopted was deeply rooted in experiential learning. The paper also suggests a framework for incorporating the concept of sustainable development into a teacher-education program.

Biography

Dr. Kalyani Akalamkam is a senior assistant professor in the Department of Education, Lady Shri Ram Collage for Women (LSR), Delhi University, New Delhi, and at present is heading her department. Her research focuses on teacher education, science education, and environmental education, and she has published in her fields. She has been teaching courses in the pedagogy of environmental studies for seven years. Dr. Kalyani Akalamkam has been the staff advisor for the college's environmental society. She has also authored a chapter on education for sustainable development and conducted several workshops for school teachers on the teaching and assessment of science and environmental science. Her doctoral thesis is in the area of physics education and is from Delhi University.


7.2.2. Addressing Economic Disparities
Location: 25 University Avenue 162

Title
Globalization of scientific research and development: a viable strategy to alleviate international economic depression

Presenter
Dr. Muhammad Mukhtar – The Islamia University of Bahawalpur
Dr. Zahida Parveen – Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia

Abstract

Over the past few decades, rapid advances in science and technology created highly visible disparity among developed and underdeveloped nations. Although every country tried to modernize its educational system, variations in national priorities and global recession severely hindered such efforts. Several developing countries, including Pakistan, initiated programs geared toward coping with emerging technologies; however, lack of appropriate infrastructure has been a major obstacle. The Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan has set up a unique paradigm for coping with these newly emerging challenges to overcome economic disparities. This presentation will mainly focus on various strategies the HEC has implemented in Pakistan and how they can be replicated for the rest of the world to overcome science and technology disparities.

Biographies

Muhammad Mukhtar holds the positions of vice chancellor and professor at the Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Dr. Mukhtar earned his doctorate in biosciences at Drexel University, Philadelphia. He also holds specialized certificates in research management, public health, and bioinformatics. In the U.S., he served in a number of academic and administrative positions. Then in 2007, he joined the Pir Mehr Ali Shah Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, as a professor of biochemistry. Dr. Mukhtar's research laboratory has studied the mechanisms of viral entry into the brain and their implications for antiretroviral therapy and explored the role of cholesterol-depleting drugs in HIV-related neuronal injury. Dr. Mukhtar and his laboratory have received several awards from the U.S. National Institutes of Health, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, and the Higher Education Commission of Pakistan. He serves as the managing editor of Frontiers in Bioscience, is on the editorial board of several national and International journals, and has numerous scholarly publications to his credit.

Dr. Zahida Parveen is a researcher in the field of gene therapy.


Title
The role of open, distance, and elearning (ODeL) in developing human capacity for food security and agricultural development in Africa

Presenter
Felix Kayode Olakulehin – University of Leeds

Abstract

The issue of food security is central to socioeconomic development in most African nations and is perhaps the most resonant reflection of the poverty level of Africans. The World Bank states that a vast majority of Africans are living on less than one dollar a day. Along the same line, analysts have observed a strong relationship among poverty, education, and development. For instance, most farmers in Africa are not just poor; they are also illiterate and have great difficulty in accessing knowledge of techniques which would have gone a long way in addressing a part of the food-security problem in the continent. Consequently, a strategy for training and education of the agricultural extension workers and other professionals through elearning facilities, amidst other distance education approaches, is considered. Discussants will stimulate thinking along this line and consider the issues and challenges involved in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and how they relate to food security in Africa, current food-security practices in Africa, the role of agricultural extension agents in food production, developing ICT capacities of the extension workers to improve the knowledge of farmers in Africa, the role of distance education in basic literacy development, and the role of elearning in food security management in Africa.

Biography

Felix Kayode Olakulehin is a research fellow at the National Open University of Nigeria and is currently doing research for a doctorate at the University of Leeds, United Kingdom.


Theme: Best Practices in Higher Education

Individual Presentations

7.3.1. Knowledge Management 2
Location: Anderson 120

Title
A "just-in-time" framework for pedagogy and curriculum

Presenter
Jacqueline M. Zalewski, Leigh S. Shaffer – West Chester University

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

The evolving nature of knowledge, information, and roles in the workplace—the new actualities of the post-industrial workplace and information society—call into question past assumptions shaping educational goals, practices, and knowledge transfer. We have argued that educational practices should mirror the new "just-in-time" nature of work, information gathering, and production. In this paper we begin by describing our earlier theoretical argument. Next, we describe ways that instructors in higher education can and do adopt just-in-time pedagogy and curriculum. We conclude by describing the value a just-in-time framework has for building valuable human and cultural capital.

Biographies

Jacqueline M. Zalewski is in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, West Chester University. She has collaborated with Leigh Shaffer on several journal publications on topics such as pedagogy and career advising.

Leigh S. Shaffer is retired from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, West Chester University.


Full Session

7.3.2. Workshop: Social Action Approach in Higher Education
Location: Anderson 103

Presenter
Alison Dobrick, EdD – William Paterson University of New Jersey

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Social action is a core concept of critical pedagogy. Through learning about and engaging in social-action projects, students of all ages meaningfully consider and act upon their understanding of current local and global realities. This workshop will explore two case studies of the Social Action Approach (Banks, 2002) in higher education, one in the social sciences and one in teacher education, in terms of content, practice, and impact on students' learning. Participants will learn to inspire their students by incorporating the Social Action Approach in their own educational contexts.

Biography

Alison Dobrick, EdD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education at William Paterson University of New Jersey. She also serves as director of the William Paterson University Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. She is a National Board Certified Teacher at the elementary level.


Theme: Globalization and Transnationalization in Higher Education

Individual Presentations

7.4.1. Public Higher Education in Costa Rica 2
Location: Anderson 111

Title
The state of affairs of higher education in Costa Rica

Presenter
Sandra Palacios, Yalile Jiménez Olivares – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

Higher education in Costa Rica is composed of two main subsystems: parauniversity and university. Parauniversity higher education focuses on short-term careers of only two or three years, while university higher education takes up to four or more years. The latter subsystem holds most of the population seeking a graduate degree. According to CONESUP (Consejo Nacional Nacional de Educacion Superior Privada), which regulates private higher education, there are fifty private universities in Costa Rica. On the other hand, there are only five state universities in CONARE (Consejo Nacional de Rectores), the entity that regulates public universities. Considering these case scenarios, this investigation analyzes Costa Rican public and private education in terms of the number of students enrolled, academic program offerings, the number of degrees awarded, and accredited programs.

Biographies

Sandra Palacios holds a licentiate´s degree in applied linguistic in English from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica, and a master´s degree in linguistics from Ball State University, U.S.A. She has taught for ten years at the high-school level and six years with university students. She has also participated in national and international conferences for teachers of English and been a trainer for several courses in the CONARE-MEP program.

Yalile Jiménez holds a licentiate´s degree in applied linguistic in English and a master´s degree in second language and culture with an emphasis in English from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. She has worked for ten years teaching beginning, intermediate, and advanced students at Universidad Nacional. She is currently working at Universidad Nacional, Brunca Extension, in the English teaching major and CONARE-MEP training courses.


Title
Higher education in the peripheral regions of Costa Rica and its organizational challenges

Presenter
Víctor Julio Baltodano, Orlando de la O – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract - Complete Presentation (pdf)

A university should respond to its changing and complex environment. In the case of the regional headquarters of the Costa Rican public universities, the challenge is greater because of the necessity of responding to local needs in addition to a national and global vision. The current environment brings new realities that impact the university: reduced space, distance education, and less time spent in interpersonal communication. The university curriculum and organization should be flexible to respond rapidly to regional needs. Among the challenges that can be added to the regional university campuses are the preservation of cultural identity, the modernization and humanization of corporate governance, and contributions to the formation of a society with sustainable human development.

Biography

Víctor Baltodano is a professor at Universidad Nacional (UNA), Costa Rica, where he is an economist and doctoral student in the social sciences. Professor Baltodano has been the director of the Chorotega Regional Office of Universidad Nacional (1995-1997) and academic director of UNA's Nicoya Campus (2008-2010). He has over 25 publications in national and international journals. His research interests include culture, economics, tourism, and higher education.

Orlando de la O holds a master's degree in education and is currently the dean of the Chorotega Regional Office of Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. He has spoken at conferences and seminars throughout Latin America. In addition, he is the author of several books on poetry, culture, and education and has published a number of articles in national and international journals.


Posters

 

Theme: Best Practices in Higher Education

Title
Undergraduate social work assessment trends: implications for BSW competency in macro contexts

Presenter
Claire L. Dente, PhD, LCSW – West Chester University

Abstract

This poster presents data from assessment of student competency in engaging, assessing, intervening, and evaluating multiple client systems: individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities. It addresses unmet benchmarks indicating decreasing competency as interventions move to mezzo/macro levels. These data raise competency issues for students desiring to intervene at macro levels. Potential explanations for results are discussed, including data collection, instruments, data analysis, and student conceptualizations of mezzo/macro and global interventions. Interventions to address results that concurrently addressed student consideration of communities beyond local environments are also presented. Implications for social-work education and student understanding of globalization will be discussed.

Biography

Claire L. Dente, PhD, LCSW, is an assistant professor in the Undergraduate Social Work Department at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She teaches courses in social-work practice, family systems, and research methods. She also serves as the assessment coordinator for the department.


Title
Multicultural considerations for disability support services in higher education

Presenter
Vickie Ann McCoy, Eric Owens, Karen Dickinson, Jennifer Walker – West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

As we consider the needs of international and multicultural students in higher education, we wonder about their experiences with and attitudes toward disability service provision. We question whether our current U.S. system, which is focused on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), sufficiently accounts for the experiences and viewpoints of persons with roots in other countries and cultures. Even more importantly, after our initial exploration of the literature, we are now asking, "What can we learn from what is being done in other countries?" Our poster is a philosophical best-practices proposal in higher education disability service provision.

Biographies

Vickie Ann McCoy is an assistant professor in the West Chester University Department of Counselor Education. Prior to her position at WCU, Dr. McCoy worked at the Institute for Disability Studies at the University of Southern Mississippi and was the coordinator of Counseling and Testing Services for Students with Disabilities at Monmouth University.

Eric Owens is an assistant professor in the Department of Counselor Education at West Chester University. Prior to coming to WCU, Dr. Owens worked as a counselor in higher-education settings, as well as serving as the director of Counseling Services at Vincentian Academy, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Karen Dickinson is an assistant professor in the Department of Counselor Education at West Chester University. She has taught special education and has been involved with counseling students with disabilities and making accommodations with students with disabilities at the elementary-school level.

Jennifer Walker is a graduate assistant in the Department of Counselor Education at West Chester University and is working toward a master's degree in counseling.


Theme: Globalization and Transnationalization in Higher Education

Title
Managing LGBT identity on an international exchange: can you pack safe space in your suitcase

Presenter
Alannah Crooms, Erin Hipple, Lauri Hyers, PhD – West Chester University

Abstract

When students and faculty go on short-term international academic exchanges (i.e., semester or year-long study abroad, faculty exchanges, etc.), they are faced with a short time window to adapt to cultural differences in language, daily living, and academic practices. This situation is part of the adventure of international exchange, yet for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered students and faculty, there is an added challenge of managing sexual and gender identity in a new community where individual, group, or national values are inevitably going to vary from one's home institution. Newcomers to any social setting tend to withhold and conform more, especially when they are just learning new group norms. This can lead otherwise "out" (open about their LGBT status) faculty and students back into "the closet" (concealing their LGBT status), at the beginning, throughout, and even after their stay abroad. Being "out" means embracing one's sexual or gender identity, and it often comes with a feeling of responsibility to bring LGBT-positive role modeling and LGBT-friendly "safe space" to any community in which one works, socializes, and resides. A new international context brings new risks, and unknown personal and political considerations. Those who bring their safe space with them may help support other LGBT students and faculty in their new setting, but they risk social rejection or even physical danger. Those who go back into the closet face the old burdens of code-switching and deception, along with potential guilt over not supporting other LGBT individuals. This poster will explore some of these personal, interpersonal, and political issues surrounding identity negotiation and safe space on international exchange for LGBT faculty and students, including ways that home universities can provide them with the support they need to make the best choices for themselves and their new communities.

Biographies

Alannah Crooms is a senior psychology major at West Chester University. Alannah is studying to pursue work with children in poverty and those with special needs and holds interests in discrimination, activism, oppression, women's studies, and clinical psychology.

Erin Hipple is a senior at West Chester University and is majoring in psychology and pre-medical studies. She is also a yoga teacher and Thai yoga therapist. She was certified to teach yoga at Integral Yoga Institute in Manhattan and spent eight months studying meditation and yoga at Ananda Ashram, in Monroe, New York.

Lauri Hyers, PhD, is an associate professor in the Psychology Department at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She received her doctorate from the Pennsylvania State University with a specialization in social psychology. She has published broadly on issues related to ethnic identity, prejudice, and activism. She teaches courses in psychology of women, social psychology, multicultural psychology, and women's and gender studies. In the spring of 2011, she and her colleague Dr. Ellie Brown organized the successful Association for Women in Psychology Conference Generating Feminisms: Building Partnerships, Recognizing Continuity, and Growing Community across the Feminist Generation(s). In the fall of 2011, she spent the semester teaching at the American College of Norway. Now, in 2012, she is taking on a new project--developing an international, intergenerational association for activism in psychology.


Theme: Technology

Title
Assessment of veterinary drug usage in Asian shrimp aquaculture

Presenter
Loretta Parks, Charles V. Shorten - West Chester University
Robert Donofrio - National Sanitation Foundation International

Abstract

The detection of antibiotic residues in shrimp imports from Asian countries is concerning and presents a risk to human health and the environment. A preliminary antibiotic inventory list was created from 462 import alerts extracted from the European Union RASFF Portal. Contaminant levels of prohibited substances utilized in shrimp aquaculture were examined leading to the identification of 262 (62.08%) nitrofuran contaminant cases and 135 (31.99%) chloramphenicol cases. Contaminant levels in shrimp from five exporting countries were found to be statistically higher than the EU Maximum Required Performance Levels (MRPL), suggesting that banned antibiotics are frequently used in Asian shrimp aquaculture and exceed the EU threshold values.

Biography

Loretta Parks is a food safety specialist and graduate of West Chester University's MPH program. She works as a consultant in the food industry assisting clients with the development of food safety programs, regulatory compliance, training, emergency preparedness, and foodborne-illness outbreak response efforts.

Dr. Charles V. Shorten is professor and director of Environmental Health Programs at West Chester University, where he has served on the faculty since 1989. His research encompasses the fate and transport of contaminants in the environment, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments; methyl tert-butyl ether in soils; lead in soils, paint, and food ware; microbial and chemical contamination of foods; trace contaminants in air sampling equipment; hazardous materials spills and releases; nutrients and metals in streams; and streamside riparian corridor protection. His international work includes leadership in study-abroad courses in Costa Rica and China and a six-month Fulbright scholarship to the Delhi College of Engineering, in Delhi, India, where he examined soil and water conservation practices.


Dr. Robert S. Donofrio holds the position of director of microbiology and molecular biology at NSF International. He joined NSF in the fall of 2000 as a senior microbiologist and became director of the laboratory in 2004. He has researched the bioremediation of biofuels in marine and soil environments and the development and validation of novel detection and enumeration strategies for Brevundimonas diminuta in water treatment device applications. Dr. Donofrio has presented numerous posters and talks at national and international scientific meetings pertaining to research in food, water, and soil microbiology as well as nanomaterial toxicity. He has also authored several publications for peer-reviewed journals, trade journals, and training materials and has made a number of local and national media appearances.


Title
The case of the Rural Aqueducts Information System (RAIS)

Presenter
M. Sc. Edgar A. Vega Briceño – Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica

Abstract

The presentation describes an application of information and communication technologies in the social environment through the professional supervised practices of information systems for students at Sede Regional Chorotega-UNA in Nicoya, Costa Rica.

Biography

M. Sc. Edgar A. Vega Briceño is a computer scientist who graduated from Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica, where he is now a professor and advisor. He has completed post-graduate work in information management and communication technology. Professor Vega has been working in his field for 10 years. His specialties include networking, information security, and information systems.


Title
Technological facilitation of fidelity: cross-disciplinary collaboration within higher education

Presenter
Courtney L. McLaughlin, PhD, NCSP – Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Crystal Machado, EdD – Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Hayat Messekher, PhD – Ecole Normale Supérieure of Algiers, Algeria

Abstract

While learning communities are helpful in many regards, little has been documented about cross-facilitating learning communities using technologies. The presenters have established a professional learning community using Wiki and other Web 2.0 technology to (a) scaffold the development of research ideas and (b) collaborate across disciplines in writing projects. By using this medium, the isolation that is generally associated with writing for publication was reduced, international collaboration was facilitated, professionals maintained fidelity, and formative feedback on writing projects was supported. Dissemination of preliminary findings at a conference will benefit conference attendees who are interested in increasing fidelity with learning communities using technologies. Additionally, this project will have positive implications for classroom instruction.

Biographies

Courtney L. McLaughlin, PhD, NCSP, is certified as a school psychologist by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the National School Psychology Certification Board. Currently, she is an assistant professor in the Educational and School Psychology Department at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Dr. McLaughlin has published and presented on topics including school-based mental health, cognitive-behavioral therapy, children and adolescents at-risk, social emotional disorders, stress, standardized testing, disproportionality, and the training of future school psychologists. She utilizes a blended instructional delivery models with the courses she teaches at IUP.

Crystal Machado, EdD, is an assistant professor in the Professional Studies in Education Department at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she teaches education courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Her research interests include multicultural and global education, reflective practice, innovative Web-based technology, and school reform and renewal.

Hayat Messekher, PhD, is an English teacher and teacher educator at the Ecole Normale Supérieure of Algiers, Algeria. She recently finished her doctorate in composition and TESOL at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, U.S.A. She holds an MA in applied linguistics and ELT and a BA in English. Her research interests include teacher education, TEFL/TESL, reflective teaching, critical pedagogy, language and identity, and distance education.